Sushi and Stroll; Ghosts, Goblins and Gods; Fish Painting!

May at the Morikami brings a new Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods Exhibit; Family Fun Programs and Popular Sushi and Stroll Summer Walk Series

Not only is it the perfect time of year to visit the Morikami’s gardens, but there’s also plenty to do while you’re here! Join us for a special Japanese family-fun fish printing workshop, popular Sushi and Stroll Summer Walk Series and a new exhibit, Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art. Check out what the rest of the month has to offer below.

Tuesday, May 1, 8 15 & 22, 2012

Ikenobo Ikebana Flower Arrangement

    Time: 1 – 3 p.m.    Cost: $70 (Members $60) + Flower fee of $60 for all 4 weeks, payable to the instructor. Advance registration required.    Location: Oki Education Center, 4-week session

The Ikenobo Ikebana School is the oldest in Japan. Using fresh flowers, students are taught traditional flower arrangement according to the Ikenobo discipline.

Thursday,May 10, 17,  24 & 31, 2012

Sumi-e Ink Painting Floral

                                Time:10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.    Cost:$60 (Members $55). Advance registration required.

Location: Oki Education Center Studio, 4-week session

Sumi-e is a form of Japanese ink painting brought from China in the 12th century. Primarily done in black ink, the name literally means, “charcoal drawing” in Japanese.  Students learn to grind their own ink using an ink stick and a grinding stone. They will also learn how to hold and utilize brushes to create the primary sumi-e brushstrokes.  The course begins with a review of basic techniques and then students are guided as they create paintings of floral subjects.

Thursday,May 10, 17, 24 & 31,  2012

Sumi-e Ink Painting Landscape      

Time:1:30 – 3:30 p.m.      Cost:$60 (Members $55). Advance registration required.

Location: Oki Education Center Studio, 4-week session

Sumi-e is a form of Japanese ink painting brought from China in the 12th century. Primarily done in black ink, the name literally means, “charcoal drawing” in Japanese. Students learn to grind their own ink using an ink stick and a grinding stone and learn how to hold and utilize brushes to create the primary sumi-e brush strokes.   The course begins with a review of basic techniques and then students are guided as they create paintings of landscapes.

Saturday,May 5, 2012

Family Fun Workshop Series: Japanese Fish Printing     

 Time: 11:30a.m. – 12:30 p.m. or 1 – 2 p.m.

Cost: $10(With paid admission to the museum. Must register with one parent/guardian and child. No individual registrations. Each additional child $5.) Advance registration required.    Location: Classroom A

Come and enjoy Children’s Day at the Morikami, a Japanese holiday celebrated on May 5th. Make traditional prints using real fish!  The Japanese used to make prints offish to document their amazing catch that day, similar to us taking snap shots with our prize catch!

Through Sunday, May 6, 2012

Old Techniques, New Interpretations: Japanese Prints

from the Paul and Christine Meehan Collection

Time: 10 a.m.– 5 p.m.            Cost: Free with paid admission     Location:Gallery

In the early 20th century, Japanese woodblock print making experienced a revival with the development of shin hanga, the “modern print” movement, and sōsakuhanga, the “creative print” movement.   While shin hanga attempted to revive the techniques and subject matter of the centuries-old ukiyo-e tradition, which had reached its apogee in the 18th and 19th centuries, sōsakuhanga reacted against it.   The vibrant prints of beautiful women and picturesque landscapes of ukiyo-e and, later, shin hanga were the enterprise of a guild, carried out by several different craftsmen that included the designer-artist, wood-carver, colorist, printer and publisher.  In contrast, sōsaku hanga artists controlled every aspect of their work from designing the image and carving the block, to inking and printing the paper. In comparison, their compositions were also much more expressive and abstract.

In the early 1950s, sōsaku hanga artists began producing works that reflected a more contemporary view of the world, resulting in a postwar print revival that looked with great intellectual introspection at contemporary Western art ― a blending of East and West.   Throughout the decades, these artists experimented with different materials and printmaking techniques, producing highly conceptual prints that gave a definitive nod to contemporary developments in European and American painting, from the abstract aesthetics of Wassily Kandinsky (1866 –1944) to the expressionist drip paintings of Jackson Pollock (1912 – 1956). The exhibition at the Morikami Museum features more than 60 prints that celebrate over 40 years of sosaku hanga masters from Kiyoshi Saitō (1907 – 1997) to Toko Shinoda (b. 1913), among many others.

Through, May 6, 2012

Mariko Kusumoto: Unfolding Stories

Time: 10 a.m.– 5 p.m.      Cost: Free with paid admission     Location:Gallery

Japanese artist Mariko Kusumoto transforms extraordinary metal sculptures and a variety of found objects and intricate ephemera into music boxes, clocks and other constructions with multiple doors, compartments, drawers and moving parts.  Hermeticulous, hand-crafted sculptural vignettes, comprising a mélange of objects, present a wide range of whimsical, often surrealist, scenes reminiscent of various places and times, from 1850s Boston to 1950s Tokyo.   Her work incorporates a variety of metal-smithing techniques, etching, enameling and casting. With each box sculpture, Kusumoto presents a magical world of astounding detail and artistry.  The exhibition was organized by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, Mass.

Both exhibits were funded in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Charitable Foundation.

Friday, May 11, 2012

Sushi & Stroll Summer Walk Series

Time: 5:30 –8:30 p.m.

Cost: $7 adults, $5 children. (Members and children 3 and under are free); $2 for taiko performance (optional)

Summer nights in South Florida are something special, especially when they are augmented with taiko drums and a cultural backdrop that can’t be beat!  Add a cold drink, a breathtaking sunset and a walking path through a tranquil garden, and you’ve got Sushi & Stroll Summer Walks!  Stroll the gardens at your own pace and take advantage of our self-guided audio tour. Excite your palate with something delicious from our own Cornell Café, indulge in some shopping at the Museum Store or tantalize your senses with a drumming performance by Fushu Daiko.

Sunday,May 13, 2012

Family Fun Programs: Mother’s Day Craft

Time: 11 a.m.– 3 p.m.   Cost: Free with paid admission     Location:Lobby

Celebrate your mother by creating a special origami card for her.

Sunday,May 13 & 20, 2012

Sado-Omote Senke Tea Ceremony Class

Time: 11 a.m.– 12 p.m. (Individual appointments begin at 10:15 a.m.)

Cost: $45 (Members $40). Advance registration required. Please contact 561-495-0233,ext. 210, or email mmtours@pbcgov.org.    Location: Seishin-an Tea House

The class affords a unique opportunity to study the traditional art of sado, The Way of Tea.  Attending a Tea Ceremony Workshop (offered in November, January and March) is required for those who have never taken a Tea Ceremony Class, but wish to start studying sado.

Wednesday,May 16, 23 & 30, 2012

Sogetsu Ikebana Flower Arrangement

Time: 1:30 –3:30 p.m.

Cost: $52.50(Members $45) + Flower fee of $30 total for the 3 weeks payable to the instructor. Advance registration required. Location: Oki Education Center, 3-week session.

Using fresh flowers, students are taught contemporary Japanese flower arrangement according to the Sogetsu School. This class is for advanced students. Beginners are recommended to register for our Sogetsu introductory courses.

Saturday,May 19, 2012

Demonstrations of Sado, the Way of Tea

Time: 12p.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. & 3 p.m.     Cost: $5 (with paid museum admission). Reservations are required for groups of 10 or more. Please call 561-495-0233, ext. 210.   Location: Seishin-anTea House

Experience sado in the tranquil setting of the Seishin-an, the Morikami’s authentic teahouse.  Observe Japanese sado by the Omote Senke tea group, an ever-changing tea ceremony demonstration rich in seasonal subtleties.  Involvement in the true spirit of sado harmony (wa), reverence (kei),purity (sei) and tranquility (jaku), along with a sip of green tea and a sweet,will help bring a calm perspective into one’s busy life.

May 22 –Sept. 16, 2012

Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods: The Supernatural in Japanese Art

The most fundamental tenet of Japan’s native religion Shintō is the belief that spirits or gods called “kami”  inhabit the natural world.  Rocks, mountains, trees, rivers, and lakes, are all thought to house kami.  Some are regarded as benevolent guardian spirits, while others are considered harmful tricksters that deceive humans and cajole them into foolish and reckless behavior.

Ghosts, Goblins, and Gods comprises an array of paintings, prints, sculptural figures, masks, and other objects depicting other-worldly beings.  Among the mythical tricksters are tengu,half-man, half-bird forest creatures said to abduct children, and magical foxes and badgers that transform themselves into human form.  The exhibition also features representations of the Japanese gods of good fortune, wisdom, and long life, including Ebisu, the god of fishermen, Daikoku, the god of agriculture, Fukurokuju, the god of wisdom and long life, Hotei,the god of happiness, and his feminine equivalent Okame, the plump-cheeked cheerful goddess of mirth.  The exhibit would not be complete without including some fuzzy goblins from the popular Pokemon series, which have contributed to making monsters a popular theme in Japanese culture today!

Through May 31, 2012

Post-Tsunami Artwork by Japanese Students

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens will showcase artwork created by Japanese elementary school students in the aftermath of the deadly March 2011 tsunami.  Compiled from six schools in Japan’s Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures, the exhibit will be on display in the Morikami’s Yamato-kan and feature paintings based on three themes: Appreciation of World Friendship, My Life 10 Years from Now and What I Want to Do in the Future.   The paintings were originally part of an exhibition displayed in Tokyo and Nagoya, Japan, in October 2011.  The Japanese Foreign Ministry sent sets of 80 paintings to Japanese consulates worldwide.  Paintings on display at the Morikami are currently on loan from the Consulate-General of Japan in Miami.

* For more information, including materials needed for each class, please visit www.morikami.org.

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens has been a center for Japanese arts and culture in South Florida since its opening in 1977.   The Morikami invites guests to discover South Florida’s heritage and its connection with Japan, explore a series of six diverse gardens inspired by a different historical period and style of Japanese gardening.  Experience traditional and contemporary Japanese culture through world-class exhibits, varied educational programs and seasonal events, bonsai display, pan-Asian cuisine and a distinctive Museum Store. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens is open 10 a.m.to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.  The Morikami is located at 4000 Morikami Park Road in Delray Beach, Florida.  For more information about the Morikami, its exhibitions, programs and events, visit www.morikami.org or call 561-495-0233

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Student Art Reflections of Tsunami – A Must See

Morikami MuseumExhibits Paintings Created by Japanese Students in Tsunami’s Aftermath

Exhibit runsthrough May 31, 2012

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens will showcase artwork created by Japanese elementary school students in the aftermath of the deadly March 2011 tsunami.  Compiled from six schools in Japan’s Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures, the exhibit will run through May 31, 2012.

On display in the Morikami’s Yamato-kan, the exhibit features paintings based on three themes: Appreciation of World Friendship, My Life 10 Years from Now and What I Want to Do in the Future. The paintings were originally part of an exhibition displayed in Tokyo and Nagoya, Japan, in October 2011.  The Japanese Foreign Ministry sent sets of 80 paintings to Japanese consulates worldwide.  Paintings on display at the Morikami are currently on loan from the Consulate-General of Japan in Miami.

The exhibit is free with paid museum admission: adults, $13; seniors (age 65 andover), $12; children (6-17), $8; students, $8; free for Morikami members and children under 5.

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens has been a center for Japanese arts and culture in South Florida since its opening in 1977. The Morikami invites guests to discover South Florida’s heritage and its connection with Japan, explore a series of six diverse gardens inspired by a different historical period and style of Japanese gardening.  Experience traditional and contemporary Japanese culture through world-class exhibits, varied educational programs and seasonal events,bonsai display, pan-Asian cuisine and a distinctive Museum Store. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday.  The Morikami is located at 4000 Morikami Park Road in Delray Beach, Florida.  For more information about the Morikami, its exhibitions, programs and events,visit www.morikami.org or call 561-495-0233

For coverage of your events or to place an advertisement, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291