Downtown Abacoa’s Holiday Art And Fine Craft Show Calls For Artists

Downtown Abacoa offers old “Main Street” charm, classic design and a relaxed atmosphere in Jupiter, FL. Roger Dean Stadium, FAU Jupiter Campus, The Scripps Research Institute, Max Planck Florida Institute, The Hibel Museum, and more businesses and restaurants call this “home”. Celebrating the newest renovations in Downtown Abacoa is part of the wonderful atmosphere you’ll want to be part of! The Rickie Report shares a Call For Artists, Fine Crafters and Vendors for Abacoa’s upcoming Downtown Abacoa Holiday Fest on Sunday, November 28th! This one-day event on Sunday, November 29th promises fun for everyone and lots of opportunities to share and sell your artwork! The event is free to attend!




Call for Artists

Art and Fine Crafts


Downtown Abacoa Holiday Fest

Sunday, November 29, 2015

12 pm – 6 pm

Downtown Abacoa


One-Day Event
Artists to supply their own booths/tables/tents
$30. per booth space

Fine Crafts

For Application:

Contact Kelly Holland:

To receive application form, please email 3 jpegs of your work

or call


For More Information



For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420


The Art of Display Part III

Preparing for exhibits and art shows takes much forethought.  In this article, The Rickie Report will look at lighting issues and quantities of merchandise.  Is natural sunlight enough to showcase your work at an outdoor exhibit?  How much inventory should you have on hand and how much should you display at one time?  Display Part III highlights what you need to consider.



The Art of Display Part III





  • Lighting serves many purposes. You will need to consider each one depending on what you are displaying
  • Lighting creates an ambiance ( just like in your home)
  • High end creations, such as jewelry, need bright light sources
  • If you have closed cases, you can install lighting inside
  • We have found that small, tabletop self-powered lights can diminish rather than enhance your display.
  • Make sure that your application includes your electrical needs!  No one wants to arrive and set up only to realize you have no power.
  • Flameless candles are popular and set a mood, but cannot be relied upon for brightening your space.  If you are selling candles, these are a good option especially when you are at an outdoor show. They give the effect of your own candles without the worry or danger of an open flame.
  • Consider bringing your own generator to outdoor shows. Have enough fuel to power all of your electrical needs, considering the extra time for setting up and taking down, when you will want lighting.
  • If you are selling vintage pieces, a few older standing lamps can not only provide lighting, but set the tone of your display.
  •  Experiment with different light bulbs before your event
  • The quality of your lighting is just as important as the art objects you have created.
  • There are good quality, battery operated lights for 2 dimensional artwork hanging on walls.  Your investment is worthwhile!
  • Using mirrors for reflection is also a good use of light, whether natural or electrical.
  • Thinking about reflectivity: make sure your lights are not shining into the eyes of your visitors!
  • We have seen some exhibitors close off their booths with dark cloth. Once you step into their booth, their lighting truly enhances their artwork.  The sense of secrecy heightens the aura of their display and art pieces. This is especially effective when their work involves light and fiber optics.
  • Consider spot lights, flood lights, down lighting and valance lighting depending on your exhibit space and budget.
  • A word about CORDS:   SAFETY !!!   Make your best efforts to keep cords out of the walk ways in your space.  Does this mean you will need more outlets?  More extension cords?  IF you have to run cords  within your walking space, use heavy duty duct tape to keep them flat. (This is where a floor cloth or carpet comes in handy – it can minimize the “bump” of cords).



How Much to Display?


  • Don’t feel that you need to display all of your inventory at the same time
  • Remember to leave “white space” for your visitor’s eyes to rest between glances at your artistic works.
  • Showcasing a particular style of pottery:  If your exhibit space is large enough, show one of each color.  If not, show only a few AND have a color chart showing the various glazes you offer in that style.
  • Wood working:  Most of your pieces will vary according to the type and grain of wood as well as any finish or stain you’ve used.  Keep complimentary shapes together so clients’ eyes can see the variations in one spot.  Remember to use varying heights to bring interest to your display.
  • Jewelry…some people think “the more, the better”.  Depending on your creations’ colors you might want to rethink this.  We’ve been so overwhelmed by the cacophony of colors in some exhibits, that we have walked out.  Consider groupings by type ( rings, bracelets, necklaces, earrings)  and even by color or gemstone families.   A mishmash is hard to focus on. With lack of focus comes lack of sales.
  • Wall art should be hung so viewers can see the details you have painstakingly created. Not too high and not too low.
  • Consider placing some pieces on easels – both on the floor and smaller ones on table tops. Be sure the easels are stable!
  • Art pieces also are displayed on shelves, especially if they are small and can be grouped with books or other objects.
  • Have a sign indicating that you have more inventory that is not displayed. Encourage people to ask to see what else you have.  The mere act of you opening some packaging for someone else evokes a certain sense of excitement and anticipation ( like opening a gift).  Your actions will also bring more people to your exhibit space (they want to see what had previously been hidden and is about to be revealed, too!)
  • As your supply diminishes, replenish and move items around.  Showcasing smaller objects in a large basket?  Move them to a smaller basket. The smaller basket will look fuller.
  • What if you actually SELL OUT???
  • This is why you have a photo album!
  • If no replacements are available, you can rearrange your walls and displays so your lack of inventory is not so obvious.
  • Consider keeping the price and label for the item already sold and placing a “SOLD” sign  above it in large font.  Leave an obvious space.  (Customer’s remorse can play a strategic role when you are back in the area again.  They will be sure to come to your booth early next time!)
  • We urge you to display work on all sides of your walls ( especially the outside walls, which passersby see).
  • For a multi-day event, we suggest you change your wall displays. People who have attended the show on a previous day may not have noticed some of your pieces. Being in a different position, it may stand out and call to them!
  • Another use for outside walls is to hang your signage.  Let people know who and what is being exhibited and sold in your booth before they make the next step and are in front of you.


 The Rickie Report looks forward to sharing your news, when you are taking part in an exhibit or a show.  

An article in The Rickie Report is an opportunity to showcase




 For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420









Durga Garcia’s ABCs of Getting Your Work Out There Part II

Durga Garcia’s article, “The ABCs of Getting Your Work out There” continues in this Rickie Report.

Entering Art Shows


  • Read ALL information slowly and carefully AND Follow the rules


  • Make a Check list to ensure you have not missed anything!


  • Enter Shows that match your works’ theme and discipline


  • Online Exhibits  or Out of the area Exhibits:   If work needs to be shipped leave enough time for shipping ( and acts of nature like a snow storm or bad weather)!


          Can you manage the dates?

           Entry deadline date?

           Notification date?

           Delivery date (or shipping date)?

           Reception date?

          Pick up work date?  

Having someone else deliver/pick up? Have a written agreement of acceptability!




Portrait by Durga Garcia

Portrait by Durga Garcia


 The Award Ceremony



JUDGES WANT TO BE shocked or amazed, amused or educated – to see things in a way not seen  before.


For the amateur it’s a learning process that mimics being commissioned. You are working to a very  loose brief, but you are attempting to impress others rather than just yourself.



For the professional it is of course a chance to achieve greater exposure for your work, and  therefore generate more work, but it is also a chance to ‘commission yourself’ rather than working to a client’s directions.  Done correctly that can be creatively very liberating.



"Hardbody in Tutu" by Durga Garcia

Hardbody in Tutu” by Durga Garcia


Being part of an exhibit is something to be proud of, having people see your work and getting the  chance to see how people respond to your work will give you invaluable feedback in your growth as  an artist and is an important part of being an artist.




WINNING IMAGES have a “Wow” factor with with a story to say to be truly award-winning.

The image needs to be artfully constructed and technically well executed…beyond being something pleasurable to look at in a decorative way –— it should provoke or calm,  educate or entertain with innovation, humor or add revelation.



"As We Are" SOLO Exhibit at NAWA Headquarters by Durga Garcia

“As We Are” SOLO Exhibit at NAWA Headquarters by Durga Garcia


Rejections and Not Winning



  • There may be several hundred entries with only room for only 50 pieces to be exhibited.


  • More entered pieces are not accepted than shown


  • It doesn’t necessarily mean the non-accepted work is not good,  just not suitable for that exhibit, in that judges opinion, at that time or maybe needs just a little change  to be better.


  • Sometimes it is simply a matter of space.


Art is very subjective and even the most expert opinion, is just that, an opinion.



Winning, the difference between 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th place and honorable mentions could be so slight,  the same judge on a different day could easily pick a different order of winners. Being recognized as one of the best is an achievement.



Any Award is good and can become part of your resume. It is good practice to keep track of your  achievements.




Many of Durga Garcia’s images can be found in Public and Private collections.  She is a South Florida based freelance professional photographer of art for artists, portraits, commercial projects & events. Durga has several long term projects and books to her credit.


Durga brings a most uncommon background to her pictures.  She has lived in many countries and across America, working as a racehorse trainer, equine veterinary paramedic, yoga teacher, member of the U.S. International Pistol Team and certified art appraiser.  She has parlayed her years of experience as a certified art appraiser into a special talent for conveying those nuanced details in her own work. Durga maintains her Senior Fine Art Appraisal accreditations.    She lectures on photography for area groups, camera clubs and art guilds. Durga hosts a blog for photographers giving tips and tricks of the business and is writing a book for kids, “Your First Photography Book”.


In September, 2014 Durga will take part in Palm Beach State College’s “BARK” Invitational Exhibit (Palm Beach Gardens, FL). She has been invited to Tuscany in Spring, 2014 to lead a multi-discipline workshop plus a Photo Tour of Iceland in Fall, 2014.

 Durga is a Proud Member of these Professional Associations:


For more information visit:

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420


To Market, To Market…….What Are You Waiting For?

Rickie’s “Two Foot Rule”

Throughout my life, no matter what my career, profession, involvement in volunteering for small  and large organizations, or other miscellaneous activities, I found that Rickie’s “Two Foot Rule” often came into play and now is the time to share that secret with you.

“Whenever anyone comes within 2 feet of you – tell them what you are involved in!”

Are you reading this, wondering where to begin? The Rickie Report recommends that you start by making a list of all of the people you come in contact with: family, friends, neighbors, those people you “like” on Facebook, Twitter or other social media.  Do not forget to include your hairdresser, dentist (and the office staff), doctors (and their office staff), dry cleaner and favorite barrista. We are serious – make a list!  Be sure to include your insurance agent (health, auto, home) as well as your auto mechanic.

Tell everyone you know what you are creating.  You don’t have to be pushy.  Your enthusiasm, excitement, and even your confusion of where to go next with your project, will offer people an insight into your creativity.  Connecting with someone in a social situation can be as simple as saying, “Look at my new business cards!  I’m so excited about sharing them!”     If you do not have business cards – go to The Rickie Report Archives October 21, 2011.  Read. Order. Distribute. Re-order. Continue to Distribute.

By sharing  your ideas, their curiosity will be peaked. They will want to hear more about your techniques,  your product, your successes, and your learning experiences.  We don’t believe in failures – every failure is a learning experience.

The Rickie Report recently presented a marketing program to the South East Florida Polymer Clay Guild to share and elicit ideas about marketing their creative wares.  Many suggestions came from our discussion.  Make a short video or power point presentation showing how you go through the steps of developing your art.  Show photos of the various steps from beginning to end.  Bring along some of your materials.  Present a demonstration of your creative process.

Will people buy your product?  Maybe.  But they will tell others about you.  Creating a buzz factor about your work and your journey is what leads other people to join with you.

The Rickie Report empathises with the artists and artisans who apply to numerous juried shows throught the year and may feel challenged not only to create but to market themselves as well. 

Is it time for you to consider paying someone to handle your marketing?  Would hiring a high school student a few hours a month help keep your jpgs in order?   We are amazed at how often a Rickie Report staff member will attend a show and be surprised to see one of our faithful readers in a booth selling their beautiful art pieces!  When you are accepted into a show, be sure to send out press releases to the local media and to your customer list! 

Now, go forth and talk and share!

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420