Creating a New Career with Helen Brower

The Rickie Report has written articles about people of all ages and stages of life who decided to listen to their inner creative voices and try a new medium to express themselves.  Helen Brower has traveled the world and anyone who has read various travel columns or books has probably read her words!  Until now, Helen’s “voice” has been writing for others. We are pleased to share details about Helen’s first publication of her own in this article.

 

Meeting Helen Brower

 

 

Helen Brower

Helen Brower

 

 TRR: Tell us about your background

HB:

 

I’m a native New Yorker and have had a long and successful career as a freelance writer for travel and lifestyle publications (magazines, newspapers, guidebooks, etc.).  As you’ve probably guessed, as a travel writer, I did a lot of globe-trotting, sometimes spending only enough time at home to unpack, do a load of laundry, then take off on the next trip. I lived in Amsterdam and Rome and, before moving to Delray Beach, where I now live, I spent three happy years in Key West.

 

TRR:  All of your work has been non-fiction. How did you decide to share your own “voice” with this novel?

HB:

 

 

Although I earned my living as a non-fiction writer, I had always harbored a secret desire to write fiction, especially mystery novels (as you’ve probably guessed, I’ve always been an avid reader of mystery-suspense novels). However, roadblocks such as having to find an agent, having to wait months while my book was being “shopped around,” and very likely having to make changes I didn’t really approve of, kept me from making any serious attempts at fiction writing. Until, that is, the emergence of e-books which allowed writers and would-be writers the ability to self-publish without the “help” of third parties. 

 

TRR: So, the emergence of e-books made a difference for you?

HB:

 

At about the time e-books were coming into their own,  I happened to read an article in the New York Times that described Delray Beach, where I was now living, as the “recovery capital of America” (or words to that effect). I mentioned this to my sister, who knew of my love of mystery fiction, and said, half-jokingly, “why don’t I write a  mystery set in Delray Beach and call it ‘Rehab Is Murder.'” We had a good laugh about that but before you know it, I started writing.  

 

TRR:  Understanding your need to be accurate, how did you research the material?

HB:

 

In order to be as authentic as possible, I spoke with friends who have been in recovery and I also researched  the programs and facilities of some actual recovery centers. And because I’ve always liked movies and books that feature an interesting mix of personalities, in addition to the sophisticated main characters, I created a likable young couple, an amusing senior citizen pair, and several residents of the recovery center.

TRR: Can you share an overview of the book with us?

HB:

For starters, here’s the book description that appears on my Amazon book page:

The Broadway gossip hounds are poised to expose Madeline Vaughan’s little secret–her not-so-little drinking problem.  But before they can do their worst, the glamorous stage legend escapes to South Florida’s most luxurious recovery center in the hopes that its team of experts will do what they’ve done for dozens of her fellow celebrities–cure her of her addiction and do it safely away from the prying eyes of the New York tattletales’ local spies.
The treatment seems to be working and the posh facilities and glorious  surroundings only enhance her growing sense of well-being.  But Madeline soon  discovers that beneath the sparkling Florida sunshine lie some dark secrets.  The beautiful psychiatrist who runs the center divides her affections between her movie star husband and her seductive operations manager who’s taken it upon himself to entertain the female guests.  But not everybody is amused by the sexy shenanigans. Before long, violent passions explode and someone ends up dead.

 

Rehab is Murder (2)

 

TRR:  Even a book without illustrations or pictures needs a cover.  How did you go about finding the art work?

HB:

My experiences as a travel writer sent me all over the world. During a stay in Hawaii and the Asian pacific, I became good friends of a fine artist, Craig Carl and his family.  Craig’s background is graphic and commercial art.  When he heard about my novel, he offered to help with the cover.  In fact, this image was the first he drew and we both agreed he captured just the right depiction of my novel!

 

 

There are so many people who have the words but don’t quite know where to start in pursuing their dream of writing a novel that others will read.  Helen Brower is great example of someone who made that dream happen!

 

For more information about Helen’s  e-book, “Rehab Is Murder”, it is available on Amazon’s Kindle Store site and is priced at $3.99.  To contact Helen to speak to your group, please call  561-638-1268 or email hebrower@bellsouth.net

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Invites You to The Dance of the Devils

While many equate wearing masks with the fun of Halloween, Mardi Gras or Purim, the origins of masks have deeper meaning. The Rickie Report hopes you will attend the Griffin Gallery’s reception on March 13th, as they feature a collection of polychrome wooden Peruvian dance masks.  More details and a sneak peek are in this article.

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery

Features:

A collection of Polychrome Wooden Peruvian Dance Masks

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, March 13, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

 

561.994.0811

 

The exhibition continues through April 09, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

The Diablada or Danza de los Diablos (Dance of the Devils), is a dance characterized by the mask and devil suit worn by the performers. The origins and sense of patrimonial identity of this dance is a matter of dispute between authorities and historians of Bolivia, Peru, and Chile. While Peruvian and Chilean authorities claim that the dance is proper of tripartite regional identity, Bolivia’s former Culture Minister claims that the dance should solely be considered Bolivian. There is a style of dance proper of Ecuador named Diablada pillareña, and squads of Diablada were founded in other countries such as Argentina, United States, and Austria by residents from Bolivia.
Peruvian Mask

Peruvian Mask

The dance is a mixture of religious theatrical presentations brought from Spain and Andean religious ceremonies such as the Llama llama dance in honor of the Uru god Tiw (protector of mines, lakes, and rivers), and the Aymaran miner’s ritual to Anchanchu (a demon spirit of caves and other isolated places in Bolivia and Perú.) The dance represents the battle between the archangel and the seven deadly sins represented by the devil.
The Diablada was supposedly introduced in 1576 in Juli Peru to the native Lupakas people located near Lake Titicaca in the Altiplano of present-day Puno, Peru; and from there it allegedly spread to other parts of the Spanish domain in the Americas.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431. For more information please call 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800   Works cited: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablada

Brian Keeler Invites You to Paint During an “Italy Art Sojourn” this Spring!

Art instructor, Brian Keeler is inviting artists to join him for an “Italy Art Sojourn” this Spring. This trip is for painters and others who want to immerse themselves in “a figure and landscape painting course in beautiful Italy”. The next Art Sojourn is from May 17, 2014 – June 1, 2014.  The Rickie Report shares the details with you here!  Enrollment is limited so reserve your spot soon.

 

Italy Art Sojourn

 

2014  May 17,  – June 1, 2014

 

Pennellate d’Italia- Brush Strokes of Italy

 

 

Barga 2013

 


Instructor Brian Keeler, invites you to join him for “Pennellate d’Italia – Brushstrokes of Italy”, May 17 through June 1st, 2014.  This is an art adventure 
for painters and others who want to immerse themselves in a figure and landscape painting course in beautiful Italy.

 

 

 

Students in Barga

 

 

The sojourn starts in Pisa and Luca with a tour of these medieval cities before heading to the little Tuscan hill town of Barga for a week of figure and landscape painting. During the first week the group will also go to Vernazza on the Cinque Terre for painting the picturesque views of the harbor and seascape. Then on to Florence for an inspiring weekend of art and culture in some of the best museums in the world before arriving in beautiful Umbria near Todi. The trip concludes with a weekend in Rome. During the first two weeks, we’ll make stops in Orvieto, Urbino, Prato, Spoleto and Todi to visit museums, paint and enjoy the cuisine.

 

 

 

Barga Dinner- @ Riccardo

 

 


Brian has won many awards for his painting during a productive career. He is the author of a soon-to-be released art instruction book, “Dramatic Color in the Landscape” coming out this Spring and published by North Light Books. His work has been represented at the Laura Craig Gallery in Scranton, PA and the West End Gallery in Corning, NY for over 20 years.    

 

Brian’s second one-man-show, “Luminous Nature” opens on March 2nd at Philadelphia’s Rodger Lapelle Gallery.  For more information visit rodger@rodgerlapellegalleries.com or call 215-592-0232

 

 

A free brochure is available with all of the details.  Call or email for prices and particulars. bkeeler@epix.net or 570.746.1187  or   www.briankeeler.com 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Polo Player from Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE) and The Year of The Horse

Polo players have been popular sports heroes for a long time and this being “The Year of The Horse” in the Chinese zodiac, it makes sense to celebrate both.  The Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art will feature a pottery sculpture of a polo player in mid stride which dates to the Tang Dynasty plus other horse related art and artifacts. Don’t miss the Opening Reception on February 13th! The Rickie Report is pleased to share the details in this article.

 

 

 

griffinlogo

 

 

The Griffin Gallery 

Invites You 

Opening Reception

Thursday, February 13, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

Featuring a Tang Dynasty Pottery Polo Player

China, (618 – 907 CE)

 

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL
 
The exhibition continues through March 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Tang Polo Horse

Tang Polo Horse and Rider

THE YEAR OF THE HORSE
2014 is the Year of the Horse according to the Chinese Zodiac. The Year of the Horse begins January 31, 2014 and lasts until February 18, 2015.  The Chinese zodiac is represented by 12 animals, whereas some of the signs in the Western zodiac are not animals, despite the implication of the Greek etymology of “zodiac”. The animals of the Chinese zodiac are not associated with constellations, let alone those spanned by the ecliptic plane.
Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

The spirit of the horse is recognized to be the Chinese people’s ethos – making unremitting efforts to improve themselves. It is energetic, bright, warm-hearted, intelligent and able. Ancient people liked to designate an able person as ‘Qianli Ma’, a horse that covers a thousand li a day (one li equals 500 meters).
Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses' necks)

Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses’ necks)

Occupying the 7th position on the Chinese Zodiac, the Horse symbolizes such character traits as strength, energy, and an outgoing nature. Extremely animated, Horses thrive when they’re the center of attention. Always in search of a good time, Horses keep the crowds happy with their humor and their wit.
Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

PERSONALITY: Horses are extremely intelligent so they’re able to grasp new subjects with ease. They’re also capable of multi-tasking however they don’t always finish what they start because they’re forever chasing the next opportunity. Horses are honest, friendly and open-minded. They’re perhaps a bit too centered on themselves and have been known to throw tantrums when situations don’t go their way.
HEALTH: Horses are very healthy, most likely because they maintain a positive outlook on life and because they’re athletic. Lead Horses to wide, open spaces and watch them run free! Horses will usually only feel ill when they’re trapped inside.
South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

CAREER: Horses enjoy positions in which they can interact with others. They aren’t fond of taking orders and they’ll run from jobs they consider routine. They’re able to grasp new subjects with ease making them capable of handling most any job. They’re effective communicators and they enjoy power. Good career choices for Horses include: publicist, sales representative, journalist, language instructor, translator, bartender, performer, tour operator, librarian or pilot.
RELATIONSHIPS: Horses, being spontaneous, have a tendency to fall fast and hard for others. They tend to give themselves fully in each new relationship a quality that ends up chipping away at their inner being. Fortunately, this exhausting trait mellows with age and relationships are stronger and more stable later in life.
Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Horses and the 5 elements
Metal Horse – Years 1930 and 1990
Free-spirited in every sense of the word, commitment is the easiest way to scare Metal Horses away. They prefer jumping from one relationship or job to the next. Because of this, Metal Horses make better friends than partners.
Water Horses – Years 1942 and 2002
Adaptable yet indecisive, Water Horses have a tendency to flow like the current. They have trouble making up their minds and as a result, they always seem to be confusing others. And although this behavior can be frustrating, Water Horses are fun to be around so most people just get used to it.
Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Wood Horses – Years 1954 and 2014
Stable and strong, Wood Horses are better able to make decisions. They interact well with others; a trait that enables them to have more successful personal and professional relationships.
Fire Horses – Years 1906 and 1966
The fire is always burning inside Fire Horses. They love living on the edge and are always ready for change as change always is more interesting. They are incredibly opinionated and one place you’ll never find Fire Horses is standing on the fence.
Luristan Miniature Horse

Luristan Miniature Horse

Earth Horses – Years 1918 and 1978
Earth Horses will work to meet their goals, no matter how long it takes. They’ve got the ability to view situations from all perspectives and this ability is especially useful when it comes to making decisions. They’re very adaptable and they’re funny too.
Compatibility
Horses are compatible with a Dog or Tiger and incompatible with a Rat or Monkey.
Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014
Booth 3008
 
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855   www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Prized Possessions” and Presentation by Steven Maklansky

Steven Maklansky, Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art will be the featured Guest Speaker at Griffin Gallery’s Open House this week.  “Prized Possessions”  will feature a pair of multicolored Balustrade Porcelain Vases (China, 1940)as well as other Chinese Porcelain, Pottery and Cloisonné samples.  The Rickie Report urges you to attend the Public Reception to hear the speaker and see pieces of history close-up.  More details are in this article.

griffinlogo

PRIZED POSSESSIONS

CHINESE PORCELAIN, POTTERY, & CLOISONNE’

Featuring a Pair of Multicolored

Balustrade Porcelain Vases

China, 1940

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, January 09, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 

Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

The prominent Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Steven Maklansky will be guest speaker addressing the merits of gifting artwork to museums. The informative topic begins at 6:00 P.M.  The PRIZED POSSESSIONS exhibition continues through February 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Chinese Baluster Vases

Chinese Baluster Vases

THE PORCELAIN TRADE
By Mary Murphy-Gnatz, University of Minnesota, James Ford Bell Library
In his writings Juan de Mendoza of Spain described the Chinese porcelain found in many of China’s shops in 1586:  “There be also shops full of earthen vessels of divers making: redde, greene, yellow, and gilt … they made them of very strong earth … they put them into their kilns and burne them … and … [they are] brought into Portugal and carried into Peru and Nova Espana, and into other parts of the world.”
By the time Mendoza observed these wares, the Chinese had been exporting pottery for at least thirteen hundred years and had been making it for at least 5500 years. Estimates are that painted pottery was first made in China in approximately 4000 B.C.  Specimens of Chinese pottery were found in the Malay Archipelago dating back to the third century A.D., T’ang Dynasty (621-907 A.D.) pottery, of the white ware, high-fired, porcelain type, was found at an archaeological dig in Samarra, (836-883 A.D.) Mesopotamia. Speculations are that this high-fired ware originated in China around 500 B.C.
imari

19th Century Japanese Imari Porcelain Charger

In China high-fired ware is known as T’zu as opposed to low-fired ware known as T’ao. The type of clays used in pottery determines the temperature at which it can be fired. The finest T’zu or porcelain as we know it is a composite of kaolin clay, which fires white, and a feldspathic stone called pe-tun-tse; both these materials are found in abundance throughout China. When mixed at specific proportions, and fired at a minimum of 1300 C, a vitreous, translucent porcelain is produced. Some other advantages of this ware are that it can be shaped thin, into very intricate designs, and it “rings well” (similar to crystal). Fired, unglazed, pottery is known as “biscuit,”and is not considered as aesthetically pleasing as glazed porcelain. The glaze is usually made from some combination of limestone, quartz, feldspar, clay or woodash.
T’zu seems to have been first produced during the T’ang dynasty in Kiangsi province either at Ching te Chen, Jao-chou, or Chi-chou on the Kan river. China kept the secret of making fine porcelain for at least a thousand years. During that time, Chinese porcelains traveled via ship along China’s eastern coast to the Malay Archipelago, and overland via the Silk Road. During the Middle Ages, it was shipped to Japan, India, Arabia, and Africa via the Philippines. However, the very finest pieces were reserved for the Emperor’s private use, for his own household or for redistribution to worthy subjects and important visitors.
Mom

Monumental Chinese Cloisonne’ Urn Avian Motif

The Portuguese were the first to carry Chinese porcelain directly to Europe, in the sixteenth century, after they entered Asia via the sea route around the Cape of Good Hope in 1498. The first Portuguese ship arrived in Canton, China in 1513. The Dutch later expanded the export in porcelain in the seventeenth century. As a result of the capture of two Portuguese ships carrying large consignments, the European wo/man on the street was to see Chinese porcelain for the first time. For example, in 1604 when the Catherina was captured, she was carrying 100,000 pieces of porcelain. These goods were sold to buyers from all over Western Europe at a public sale in Holland. Some of the buyers represented Henry IV of France and James I of England. This sale presumably started the European craze for Chinese porcelain. Between 1604 and 1657 over 3 million pieces of Chinese porcelain reached Europe. In 1700 “East Indiamen” ships unloaded 146,748 pieces in a European port in one day alone as the market for porcelain grew insatiable.
The growing demand for porcelain spawned a desire for Europeans to produce their own “china.” A French Jesuit missionary, Pere D’Entrecolles, as a result of a little industrial espionage inside the Chinese porcelain factories at Ching-te-chen, sent a report back to Europe. His report of the process and needed materials was accurate, but he inadvertently mixed up the names of the clays. Fortunately, prior to the circulation of D’Entrecolles’ letters in Europe, Johann Friedrich Bottger and Walther Von Tschirnhaus had produced the formula in Germany on their own. Shortly after, a large source of kaolin was found near Meissen in Saxony. Porcelain was being produced in Europe by 1710 under the patronage of Augustus of Saxony that was so hard it could be “cut and polished like a jewel.”
Decorative Chinese Porcelain Dogs

Decorative Chinese Ceramic Foo Dogs

 

Despite Europe’s success at producing its own porcelain, trade in Chinese porcelain continued to thrive. Orders for 305,000 pieces to be carried by two ships, the Essex and the Townsend were placed in 1717. Four British ships delivered over 800,000 pieces in 1721. In the year 1741 French, British, Swedish, and Danish ships brought approximately 1,200,000 pieces of Chinese porcelain to Europe.
Chinese porcelain did find a European rival in Louis XV’s France. Through a series of royal decrees and restrictions in France and the employment of master artists including goldsmiths, Vincennes orSevres porcelain started to be produced in 1750. The color quality could not be equaled by any porcelain producer including those of China and Japan, and many pieces were lavishly decorated with gold. Early Sevres made of “soft paste,” a glass composite and not true porcelain, and fired at lower temperatures, absorbed colors better, produced dazzling whites and more brilliant glazes. This was the Sevres porcelain that was in such great demand by kings, emperors and princes. Catherine the Greats’ service cost an equivalent of £375,000 (value in pounds in 1971). To produce such exquisite beauty, there was much wastage of materials (soft paste is much harder to handle and the King wanted perfection). Even after the Sevres works turned to production of “true” porcelain, the production process was a heavy consumer of human life. Many workmen died of silicosis and lead poisoning in Louis XV’s porcelain factories. Little thought was given to such “hidden” costs, then or now.
Works of art disentangle themselves from their age and live serenely for other times and other men.  Ancient and modern porcelain from China, Japan, and Europe is still sold worldwide, still commands exorbitant prices; hopefully not as exorbitant as Sevres under Louis XV, and is still found as prized possessions in museums (including that found in the historic home of George Washington), fine restaurants, and in the homes of “commoners” as well as royalty.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center     Booth 3008
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  is located at  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail  in Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact:  561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery Features Roman Bronze Chariot Fitting – An Exhibit for All Ages

The Griffin Gallery is a fascinating venue for people of all ages.  History buffs and children alike will be fascinated by the vast range of artifacts this gallery has to offer.  The Rickie Report urges you to stop by to see what accomplished works of art come from the Second Century and to find a truly unique holiday gift!  More details are in this article, including a description of how bronze statuary developed.

 

 

 

griffinlogo

 

Griffin Gallery

 

Features a Roman Bronze 

Chariot Fitting of a Griffin

2nd Century CE

 

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, December 12, 2013

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 

The exhibition continues through. January 08, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

The Technique of Bronze Statuary

 

According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the ancient Greeks and Romans had a long history of making statuary in bronze. Literally thousands of images of gods and heroes, victorious athletes, statesmen, and philosophers filled temples and sanctuaries, and stood in the public areas of major cities. Over the course of more than a thousand years, Greek and Roman artists created hundreds of statue types whose influence on large-scale statuary from Western Europe (and beyond) continues to the present day.

 

Bronze Sword

Bronze Sword

 

During the third millennium B.C., ancient foundry workers recognized through trial and error that bronze had distinct advantages over pure copper for making statuary. Bronze is an alloy typically composed of 90 percent copper and 10 percent tin and, because it has a lower melting point than pure copper, it will stay liquid longer when filling a mold. It also produces a better casting than pure copper and has superior tensile strength. While there were many sources for copper around the Mediterranean basin in Greek and Roman antiquity, the island of Cyprus whose very name derives from the Greek word for copper was among the most important. Tin, on the other hand, was imported from places as far as southwest Turkey, Afghanistan, and Cornwall, England.

 

 

The earliest large-scale Greek bronze statues had very simple forms dictated by their technique of manufacture, known as sphyrelaton (literally, “hammer-driven”), in which parts of the statue are made separately of hammered sheets of metal and attached one to another with rivets. Frequently, these metal sheets were embellished by hammering the bronze over wooden forms in order to produce reliefs, or by incising designs using a technique called tracing.

 

 

By the late Archaic period (ca. 500–480 B.C.), sphyrelaton went out of use as a primary method when lost-wax casting became the major technique for producing bronze statuary. The lost-wax casting of bronze is achieved in three different ways: solid lost-wax casting, hollow lost-wax casting by the direct process, and hollow lost-wax casting by the indirect process. The first method, which is also the earliest and simplest process, calls for a model fashioned in solid wax. This model is surrounded with clay and then heated in order to remove the wax and harden the clay. Next, the mold is inverted and molten metal poured into it. When the metal cools, the bronze-smith breaks open the clay model to reveal a solid bronze reproduction.

 

Roman Bronze Griffin Chariot Fitting, 2nd Century

Roman Bronze Griffin Chariot Fitting, 2nd Century

Since the physical properties of bronze do not allow large solid casting, the use of solid wax models limited the founder to casting very small figures. To deal with this problem, the ancient Greeks adopted the process of hollow lost-wax casting to make large, freestanding bronze statues. Typically, large-scale sculpture was cast in several pieces, such as the head, torso, arms, and legs. In the direct process of hollow wax casting, the sculptor first builds up a clay core of the approximate size and shape of the intended statue. With large statues, an armature normally made of iron rods is used to help stabilize this core.

 

 

The clay core is then coated with wax, and vents are added to facilitate the flow of molten metal and allow gases to escape, which ensures a uniform casting. Next the model is completely covered in a coarse outer layer of clay and then heated to remove all the wax, thereby creating a hollow matrix. The mold is reheated for a second, longer, period of time in order to harden the clay and burn out any residue of wax. Once this is accomplished, the bronze-smith pours the molten metal into the mold until the entire matrix has been filled. When the bronze has cooled sufficiently, the mold is broken open and the bronze is ready for the finishing process.

 

 

Roman Bronze Key

Roman Bronze Key

 

In the indirect method of lost-wax casting, the original master model is not lost in the casting process. Therefore, it is possible to recast sections, to make series of the same statue, and to piece cast large-scale statuary. Because of these advantages, the majority of large-scale ancient Greek and Roman bronze statues were made using the indirect method. First a model for the statue is made in the sculptor’s preferred medium, usually clay. A mold of clay or plaster is then made around the model to replicate its form. This mold is made in as few sections as can be taken off without damaging any undercut modeling. Upon drying, the individual pieces of the mold are removed, reassembled, and secured together. Each mold segment is then lined with a thin layer of beeswax. After this wax has cooled, the mold is removed and the artist checks to see if all the desired details have transferred from the master model; corrections and other details may be rendered in the wax model at this time.

 

Bronze Head of an Eagle

Bronze Head of an Eagle

 

The bronze-smith then attaches to the wax model a system of funnels, channels, and vents, and covers the entire structure in one or more layers of clay. As in the direct method, the clay mold is heated and the wax poured out. It is heated again at a higher temperature in order to fire the clay, and then heated one more time when the molten metal is poured in. When this metal cools, the mold is broken open to reveal the cast bronze segment of the statue. Any protrusions left by the pouring channels are cut off and small imperfections are removed with abrasives. The separately cast parts are then joined together by metallurgical and mechanical means. The skill with which these joins were made in antiquity is one of the greatest technical achievements of Greek and Roman bronze working. In the finishing process, decorative details such as hair and other surface design may be emphasized by means of cold working with a chisel. The ancient Greeks and Romans frequently added eyes inset with glass or stones, teeth and fingernails inlaid with silver, and lips and nipples inlaid with copper, all of which contributed to a bronze statue’s astonishingly lifelike appearance. (Works cited: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/grbr/hd_grbr.htm )

 

Qing Alabaster Jars

Qing Dynasty Alabaster Ginger Jars, China, ca 1880

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

SAVE THE DATE !   The Original Miami Beach Antique Show   Miami Beach Convention Center   January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014    Booth 3008

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located in Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431  561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855.  For more information please visit www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Pottery Portraits of Ancient Peru

The Griffin Gallery in Boca Raton offers a wide variety of ancient objects as well as new artwork.  The Rickie Report knows you will be intrigued by their opening exhibit, “Pottery Portraits of Ancient Peru”. Come to the Opening Reception on October 10th and see the featured Moche Pottery Portrait Vessel.  The Moche, who inhabited the north coast of Peru between approximately AD 100 and 800, were remarkable artisans.  More details are in this article.

 

 

griffinlogo


POTTERY PORTRAITS OF ANCIENT PERU:

FEATURING A MOCHE POTTERY PORTRAIT VESSEL

Moche Ai Apaec

Moche Ai Apaec

Of God Ai Apaec, “The Decapitator”

Peru, ca. 400 – 500 CE

 

Opening Reception 

October 10, 2013

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 

The exhibition continues through November 13, 2013. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only, Sunday closed.

 

In his book, Moche Portraits from Ancient Peru, Christopher B. Donnan states “Of all the ancient civilizations that flourished in the Americas, only one perfected true portraiture of living people and produced it in quantity – the Moche who inhabited the north coast of Peru between approximately AD 100 and 800. Using the medium of three-dimensional ceramic vessels that could have contained liquid, Moche artisans typically formed the heads of the individuals they wished to portray, though sometimes they presented full figures with realistic portrait faces. Depicting an astonishing range of physical types, these portraits now allow us to meet Moche people who lived more than 1,500 years ago and to sense the nuances of their individual personalities.”

 

 

Moche potters of ancient Peru were remarkable with sculptural naturalism and represented everything about their world in their work in the form of royal portraits, religious rituals, domestic scenes, animals, plants, and even supernatural deities. Other unique portrait jars depict weakness, physical disabilities, genetic defects, and even sexual reproduction was represented in vessels called “sex pots” whose ownership was restricted to the elite members of the community.    

 

Works Cited: http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/donmoc

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at  Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail in Boca Raton, FL 33431  For more information contact: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855,  visit www.griffingallery.net or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

The Intrigue of Ancient Women Of Ancient Greece & Rome

The Rickie Report finds ancient sculpture intriguing. Who were these women and where did these pieces stand?  Were they gifts from an admirer or from the imagination of a hired artist?  Did a small child look at one and be inspired to become an artist one day or was it the child’s mother?  Of course, we also wonder about the life of the artist who made each of these ancient relics. We hope you will go to see the newest exhibit at the Griffin Gallery, “Women of Ancient Greece & Rome”.  

 

 

The Griffin Gallery

 Invites you to:

 

Opening Reception

Thursday December 13, 2012

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

Various Artifacts 4th Century BCE – 1st Century CE

The exhibition continues through January 09, 2013. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only, Sunday closed.

Both Greece and Rome are Mediterranean countries, but the terrain of the two is very different. The ancient Greek city-states were separated from each other by hilly countryside and all were near the water. Rome was inland, on one side of the Tiber River, but the Italic tribes (in the boot-shaped peninsula that is now Italy) did not have the natural hilly borders to keep them out of Rome. In Italy, around Naples, Mt. Vesuvius produced fertile land by blanketing the soil with tephra which aged into rich soil. There were also two nearby mountain ranges to the north (Alps) and east (Apennine).

Roman Marble Cybele

Greek art is considered superior to (imitative) Roman art. The goal of the classical Greek sculptors was to produce an ideal artistic form, where the goal of Roman artists was to produce realistic portraits for decoration. This is obvious oversimplification, especially when considering the division of Greek art into the Mycenaean, geometric, archaic, and Hellenistic periods, in addition to the Classical, but the art we associate with Greece is the Venus de Milo, and the Roman art is the mosaic or wall painting known as fresco.
 The social classes of Greece and Rome changed over time, but there were basic divisions of early Athens and Rome.  In Greece there were slaves, freedmen, metics, citizens, women.  In Rome there were slaves, freedmen, plebeians, patricians. Greek (at least Athenian) women were not citizens while Roman women were. Both societies were also divided according to wealth.

Greek Athena Coin

As are all the other categories, this is a complicated area and what is true of Athens is not true of Sparta. Dealing with Athens, according to the literature, women were valued for not gossiping, for managing the household, and, most of all, for producing legitimate children. The aristocratic woman was secluded in the women’s quarter and had to be accompanied in public places. She could own, but not sell property. The Athenian woman was subject to her father, and even after marriage, he could ask for her return. She was not a citizen.
The Roman woman was subject to the pater familias, whether the dominant male in her household of birth or the household of her husband. She could own and dispose of property and go about as she wished. From epigraphy, we read that a Roman woman was valued for piety, modesty, maintenance of harmony, and being a one-man woman. She could be a Roman citizen.

Roman Bone Attachment

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.  It is located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431. For more information: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net or  

griffingallery18@yahoo.com.  This exhibit is sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800.  The works cited: http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/greecevsrome/ss/GreecevsRome_3.htm

The Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art Reminds you to:

SAVE THE DATE

The Original Miami Beach Antique Show

Miami Beach Convention Center

January 31, 2013 – February 04, 2013

Booth 3008

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

World Famous Glass Mosaic Artist is Here! RSVP Now!

The Rickie Report knows how lucky we are to live in this area and have so many choices of speakers, gallery openings, and other art related events.  This one is not to be missed!  Vanessa Somers Vreeland is currently working at The Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach on a series that will be featured in Toulouse, France starting in July 2012.

Yellow Orchid (mirror, gold, glass, marble mosaic)

On Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. Vanessa Somers Vreeland will present an illustrated talk on her artistic process and the art of mosaics. Reservations can be made by calling (561) 832-1776 x15.  Free and open to the public.

“My Passion is to create new, exciting and unique mosaic art-drawings on themes of the past, in this recently rediscovered medium.”

Vanessa began her artistic career as a traditional painter in Paris. Her curiosity about transparency led her to experimenting with glass. She studied with Professor Odoardo Anselmi, artistic director of the Vatican Mosaic Studio in Rome. Her very successful career in fused glass mosaic technique and works in marble and cold glass in traditional Roman style paved the way for many international lectures and teaching positions. These include The Corning Museum of Glass, Penland School of Crafts, Columbia Museum of Art, The American Craft Museum, The Getty Museum, and Pilchuck Art School.

In Vitas Veritas: Hand Cut Marble and Glass Mosaic

ASARATON is a mega mosaic recently on view in The Rodin Gallery, Legion of Honor Museum in San Francisco. Vanessa is exploring the concept of a lecture and exhibition of this piece at both The National Gallery and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. She has had exhibitions in Paris, New York, Brussels, Rome, Florence and North Africa. Her studio is in Rome.

The Armory’s mission is to provide high-quality visual art school and art gallery services that stimulate personal self-discovery and generate knowledge and awareness of art as part of life. For more information on The Armory Art Center, or to sign up for classes, visit www.ArmoryArt.org or call (561) 832-1776.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

ArtiGras 2012 Behind The Scenes – ArtiGras 2013 Application

ArtiGras gets a large crowd of attendees as well as hundreds of applications from artists and artisans to be accepted into this prestigious show each year.   The Rickie Report had the opportunity to speak the judges of Artigras 2012.

Consider these numbers:

Applicants to ArtiGras 2012:  1,100  Accepted:  280

Emerging Artist Applicants:  42  Accepted: 13

The application process for ArtiGras 2013 begins in April!

The day after ArtiGras 2012 is over marks the beginning of the planning process for ArtiGras 2013.  Did you notice that this is truly a “show within a show” in many aspects?  There are the 280 artists’ tents and 13 more to include “emerging artists” ( who have not been in a professionally juried show before).  There are the food and beverage vendors and don’t forget the local non-profit organizations whose presence informs the community.

Add to this the entire local school district’s involvement in the “recycle art” program which enhances the decor of the refuse cans along the ArtiGras route.  We hope you put your coins in the boxes to vote for your favorite!   The top 10 prize winners will get monies for their school arts programs.  There were 20 participants this year, including whimsical and serious “recycle” messages.

The 2012 theme, “One of a Kind”  worked well.  The 30 committee members (all volunteers) and the 1,200 other volunteers needed to make this event happen seamlessly are the true heroes.   A post-event survey will be sent out to help form Artigras 2013 into an even better event.

The Rickie Report often hears grumbling comments about having to pay to walk into ArtiGras, when other art and craft shows on the streets of our communities are free and open. Why is Artigras different?

There is rigorous jurying involved with this event, as you can see from the number of applicants.  Professional judges are involved in the three day-long jurying process.  The Northern Palm Beach Cultural Council accepts applications from April through September.  In October, the jurors meet for an “open jurying” process.  They spend 3 days from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm looking through the digital Zapplication files. 

Did you know that anyone is welcome to be present during the jurying process?  This “‘open jurying” helps artists understand the underpinnings of the heart of this show.  The jewelry applications include the highest number of applicants and can take over 3 hours to go through.  The judges are looking at digital images, one at a time, in each category.  They then record their choices through a numbering system.

If you are applying, you can see not only your work, but your competition’s!   This is a moment you might want to take advantage of…see where you stand in the line up.  Sobering yet a real life learning opportunity.  The staff will let applicants know the approximate hours and day that their category will be judged.

In addition to this exhaustive and intense jurying system, ArtiGras offers live entertainment, demonstrations by the artists, a kids area where they can make show their own budding artistry and painting classes for adults.  All of the monies generated by Artigras stay in the local community, going to schools and area non-profit groups.  The ArtiGras planners try to ensure that there is something for almost everyone, meaning price points ranging from $8.00 to beyond.  In fact, The Rickie Report was impressed with the affordability of this show’s wares.

Once an artist has been accepted to ArtiGras, their judgement days are not over!  There is a different set of judges who walk the entire show, deliberating which artist will be deemed “Best of Show” and awarded  $3,000.  Plus, First Place of each of the 13 mediums will be judged and awarded $1,000. each.

Judith Wood of West Palm Beach, FL was awarded Best in Show with her mixed media jewelry.  “Wow! That is the best adjective I can think of to describe how I feel.  Winning Best in Show was not expected so all I can really say is wow”, she shared.

Necklace by Judith Wood

The winners were selected by three judges who scored each artist and awarded a Best in Show and a first-place winner in each of the 13 categories. The following is a list of the artists who placed first in each category:

Marvin Bower of Boonsboro, MD, in Fiber – Wearable; Jayne Demarcay of Abita Springs, LA, in Jewelry; Shelagh Forrest of Gainesville, FL, in Photography; R.C. Fulwiler of Lakeland, FL, in Digital Art; Peter Gerbert of Dade City, FL, in Painting; Barrie Harding of Dunnellon, FL, in Wood; Corey Johnson of Royal Palm Beach, FL, in Mixed Media; Edward Loedding of Brandon, VT, in Drawing and Printmaking; Don McWhorter of Carrollton, GA, in Ceramics; Richard Ryan of Bourbonnais, IL, in Glass; Alex Santamarina of San Francisco, CA, in Metal; Jean Yao of Ft. Lauderdale, FL, in Fiber – Nonwearable.

Gilded Koi by Corey Johnson

There are so many aspects to ArtiGras that  you need more than one day to walk the show, speak with the artists ( who must be at their booths unless they are relieved by an ArtiGras volunteer for a break), take in all of this creative energy, and hopefully, go home with a new piece of hand made artwork.   The artists also have an opportunity to donate a piece of their work to a children’s sale.  You will see a purple ribbon “thank you” at these artists’ tents.  (As we said, this is truly a “show within a show”).

The winners of the 2012 ArtiGras Youth Art Competition were announced  the first day of the ArtiGras Fine Art Festival presented by Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center.  More than 250 students in grades kindergarten – 12th submitted artwork for the competition in mediums ranging from pencil and crayon to chalk and paint.  Artwork was judged by local artists and art educators who had the daunting task of narrowing down the hundreds of entries to only 77  finalists then selecting a first, second and three place winner along with three honorable mentions for each school grade.

The following is a list of the first, second and third place winners along with three honorable mentions per school grade:

Place

Student Name

School

Grade

1

Audrey Libkie Jupiter   Elementary K

2

Kelly Ferrell Timber Trace   Elementary K

3

Ezekiel   Encarnacion Cypress Trails   Elementary K
HM Lexi Vryonides Palm Beach Gardens   Elementary K
HM Elani Nickles Lighthouse   Elementary K
HM Tess Kruger Elbridge Gale   Elm K

1

Michael Brand   Campbell Timber Trace   Elementary 1st

2

Aine Mullen UB Kinsey EL   School of Arts 1st

3

Selena Calix Dr. Mary Mcleod   Bethume Elementary K 1st
HM Brett Sarcia Good Shepherd   Episcopal 1st
HM Jaidyn   Houghtaling Panther Run   Elementary 1st
HM Jessica Reason Marsh Pointe   Elementary 1st

1

Jean-Luc Abito Jupiter   Elementary 2nd

2

Ali Spector Lighthouse   Elementary 2nd

3

Michelle   Williams Dr. Mary Mcleod   Bethune Elementary K 2nd
HM Trinity   Williamson Marsh Pointe   Elementary 2nd
HM Ariel Hayden Palm Beach   Gardens Elementary 2nd
HM Christopher   Benson Discovery Key   Elementary 2nd

1

Eddie Diaz Panther Run   Elementary 3rd

2

Shannon Meloy Timber Trace   Elementary 3rd

3

Tommie McCarthy Jupiter Academy 3rd
HM Alexis   Internicola Marsh Pointe   Elementary 3rd
HM Angelina   Perumal Loxahatchee   Groves Elementary 3rd
HM Tyler Mizell Poinciana Day   School 3rd

1

Meredith   Fortini Timber Trace   Elementary 4th

2

Emily Evans Jerry Thomas   Elementary 4th

3

Tessa Holt Beacon Cove   Intermediate 4th
HM Carly Coffey Northbora   Montessori Elementary 4th
HM Vyona Smith UB Kinsey EL   School of Arts 4th
HM Jamie Jerchower Panther Run   Elementary 4th

1

Morgan Grigsby Jupiter   Christian School 5th

2

Madison Root Panther Run   Elementary 5th

3

Margretanne   Frasca Good Shepherd   Episcopal 5th
HM Adiana Skye   Underwood Jupiter Academy 5th
HM Lauren   Griffiths Golden Grove   Elementary 5th
HM Corrine Irving Poinciana Day   School 5th

1

Stephanie Mino Watson B.   Duncan Middle School 6th

2

Compton Waldron Jupiter Middle   School 6th

3

David Libfeld Poinciana Day   School 6th
HM Katie Sproule Jupiter   Christian School 6th
HM Sydney Arroyo Gove Elementary 6th
HM Christina   Carlson St. Mark’s   Episcopal 6th

1

Matthew Serrano Watson B.   Duncan Middle School 7th

2

Riley Snowney Jupiter Middle   School 7th

3

Caleb Thompson Lake Park   Baptist 7th
HM Logan Moecher Jupiter   Christian School 7th
HM Isabella M   Reynolds Wellington   Christian School 7th
HM Dhivaan Salig Poinciana Day   School 7th

1

Heather Hart Jupiter Middle   School 8th

2

Summer Scherb Jupiter   Christian School 8th

3

Devin Michael   Stephens Watson B.   Duncan Middle School 8th
HM Dean Biggs St. Mark’s   Episcopal 8th
HM Lauren Burden Lake Park   Baptist School 8th
HM Kristina   Pereira Wellington   Christian School 8th

1

Sarah Ammirato Palm Beach   Central High School 9th

2

Chelsea   Pontbriand Jupiter High   School 9th

3

Megan Derleth Jupiter   Christian School 9th
HM Maham Karatela Suncoast High   School 9th
HM Angelica   Bafitis The Benjamin   School 9th

1

Gabriella   Logiudice Suncoast   Community High School 10th

2

Robyn Rosier Seminole Ridge   High School 10th

3

Beau Britt Wellington   Christian School 10th
HM Evi Seely Jupiter High School 10th
HM Riley Otowchits Jupiter   Christian School 10th
HM Tristan Torrey The Benjamin   School 10th

1

Meagan Dobson Palm Beach   Central High School 11th

2

Carmen Chaparra Suncoast High   School 11th

3

Samantha Hoek Jupiter High   School 11th
HM Samantha Smith Jupiter High   School 11th
HM Rachel   Bertolozzi Jupiter   Christian School 11th
HM Jessica Sanchez Wellington High   School 11th

1

Patricia Nicole   Serrano Seminole Ridge   High School 12th

2

Jane Jun Jupiter High   School 12th

3

Britta Smythe Wellington   Christian School 12th
HM Mary O’Connor Suncoast High   School 12th
HM Diamond Lewis Palm Beach   Central High School 12th
HM Sasha Nicole   Cornello Royal Palm   Beach High School 12th

The judges listed below decided on the cash prizes.  It took them almost a full day on Saturday to achieve their goal.  They looked not only at the artists’ work but also their displays.  The Rickie Report has written about this aspect of being in a show previously.  For the artists reading this, please consider how appealing your display is – by the time someone has reached your booth they have probably seen other booths in a similar medium.  What will make yours stand out from the rest?

Meet the jurors:

Andrea Schoen

Andrea Schoen is an accomplished Art Teacher who has now retired and returned to her passion of jewelry design and creation.  From 1988 to 2006, Andrea was a tenured Art Teacher at Spring Valley HS- Art/Comp Graphics and Studio Art.  She taught Primary through High School levels developing specialized programs in darkroom, photography, computer graphics and calligraphy. Upon retiring, she continued her studies in glass and metal work.  She has sharpened or added to her skills in fabrication, stone setting, wax, enameling, hinges, clasps, casting, lapidary, and jewelry repairs.  Andrea is currently the 2011-2012 Vice President of the Florida Society of Goldsmiths SE Chapter.

Ilene Adams

With over 25 years of professional experience in graphic design, print making, illustration, fabric design, and faux finishing, Ilene brings a wealth of information and creativity to her work.  After owning a nationally acclaimed broadcast marketing company in the Northeast for over 20 years, Ilene focused her energy and skills on the creation of wonderful, warm environments for homes and businesses from New York to Miami.  She has over 300 commissions and collections in homes and businesses from Boston to Ft. Lauderdale.  An award winning artist, Ilene has been featured in many design magazines both in the New York metropolitan area and the Palm Beaches.  Ilene’s business and art education spans Harvard University – MA, School of Visual Arts – NY, Temple University, Tyler School of Art – PA, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Tyler School of Art, ROME.

Ofra Friedman

Ofra Friedman is a sculptor who works with a unique technique of wire mesh, welded metal and mixed media.  Her sculptures are in public and private collections throughout Florida and in Canada.  In 2009 she created 3 outdoor sculptures for Tampa outdoor kinetic sculpture competition, and was awarded ‘People’s choice’ award for her sculpture.  Ofra is an experienced judge and a prolific art exhibitor throughout Florida. She brings a well rounded and diverse, global art education beginning with Wire Mesh Sculpture gained in Israel, Stone Sculpture acquired in Florida, Visual Arts and Interior Design studied in Maryland and Performing Arts and Dance in New York.  She is a member of a number of professional organizations dedicated to the women and the arts throughout Florida.

Joe Korth

A jewelry artist and metalsmith from Denver, Colorado.  Joe was born in Berkeley, CA.  His first exposure to jewelry creation was in a high school art class.  Joe continued his education at Eastern Michigan University where he earned a B.A. with a dual major in Philosophy and Literature.  After completing his degree in 2002, he moved to Denver and began to explore his love for the arts.  He enrolled in classes at the Clear Creek Academy of Jewelry and Metal Arts (formerly the Denver Jewelry Academy) and began exploring his potential as a jewelry artist.  He has devoted himself completely to jewelry since 2004.  Joe is currently working as an instructor at the Clear Creek Academy, teaching the Introduction and Intermediate level Silversmithing classes as well as a workshops in Chainmaking and Jewelry Photography.  Since 2009, Joe has been on the Board of Directors of the Colorado Metalsmithing Society.

The Rickie Report spoke to each of these jurors to get their impressions of the overall show, the artwork, and personal observations.  They all agreed they enjoyed the experience and would be interested in jurying this as well as other shows in the future.  Each judge, when interviewed, expressed amazement at how well managed ArtiGras is, considering its large scope.

TRR:  How did you prepare for this jurying process?

The Judges:  We met for the first time on Saturday at ArtiGras.  We agreed that there would be a scale from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest).  We tried not to use “4” unless necessary.  Zapplications provided us with wireless computers to keep track of the scoring and make sure we saw every artist’s tent.  This process eliminated discussion among us and helps eliminate our own personal opinions.  Though there was a learning curve using the new technology, most agreed that this leveled the playing field in terms of scoring.  The computer program also gave thumbnail overviews of each artist’s work.  This turned out to be important not only to help the judges score the correct booth, but to ensure that the work the artist was initially accepted for was indeed in their booth.  Judges disqualified themselves from scoring artists with whom they had personal relationships.

TRR: Tell us about your overall impression of the work you saw this year.

The Judges: Some of it was beautifully crafted, while a large part of the wares the vendors were selling were commercially oriented.  One judge felt that 5-10% was truly fine art and considered it very well done.  The excitement of seeing an artist create a totally new medium impressed all of them.  While one judge may look for emotion, depth and originality, another is looking for craftsmanship and creativity.  There may have been many potters, the ones that stood out were trying new processes and working with new materials.  Though the jurying process was exhausting, it engendered a lot of excitement because of this creative energy.

TRR:  Do you have any suggestions for artists applying to shows such as ArtiGras?

The Judges:  An artist should develop a clear artistic style.  This does not mean they cannot grow or change, but there needs to be a common element in each of their pieces of work.  Maintain your training.  Keep sharing with other artists in your field and accept feedback.  Identifiability is necessary for success but you don’t have to confine yourself.  Consider having a well-rounded approach to what you are offering to the consumers: some semi-commercial pieces which are your “bread and butter” and some one-of-a-kind pieces as well.  Hone your business skills.  If you are not sure how to market yourself, hire someone to do that part of the business while you work on your art.   Most people attending an art show like this are looking at aesthetics and elements of design rather than technical aptitude. Do something with your tent/booth area to draw people in.

The Rickie Report thanks the judges, organizers, and artists of ArtiGras 2012 for sharing their insights.  TRR is honored to have been part of the call not only for artists but judges as well.   For more information about ArtiGras contact: Suzanne@npbchamber.com or 561-748-3945.

ArtiGras 2013 Application is ready – go to:

 www.artigras.org

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291