Griffin Gallery Celebrates Women From Antiquity To Contemporary Times

The Griffin Gallery specializes in “Art through the Ages” and invites the public to visit their location  in Boca Raton, FL.  Browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age.  Celebrating “Women’s History Month”, Griffin Gallery will feature items from the Ming Dynasty, ancient Rome, early 20th Century, the Collection of Elizabeth Taylor and an Ecuadorian terra-cotta.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and the details here.

 

 

 

5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4      Boca Raton, FL 33487

561.994.0811

 

 

 

G  R  I  F  F  I  N          G  A  L  L  E  R  Y

PRESENTS:

 

 

WOMEN  FROM

ANTIQUITY  TO  CONTEMPORARY  TIMES:

 

 

Ming Dynasty Stone Head of Guan Yin, China (1368 – 1644)
Roman Marble Head of a Young Woman, 1st Century BCE – 1st Century CE
Burkina Faso Bronze Female Riding a Turtle, Early 20th Century
Collection of Elizabeth Taylor, Jay Strongwater Swarovski Crystal Picture Frame, 20th Century
Jama Coaque Terracotta Female, Ecuador 400 BCE – 500 CE

 

 

 

According to Molly Murphy MacGregor, Executive Director and Co-founder of the National Women’s History Project, as recently as the 1970’s, women’s history was virtually an unknown topic in the general public’ consciousness. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (CA) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978. The week March 8th, International Women’s Day, was chosen as the focal point of the observance. The local Women’s History Week activities met with enthusiastic response.  Over one-hundred women participated by doing special presentations in classrooms throughout the country and an annual “Real Woman” Essay Contest drew hundreds of entries. 

 

In 1979, Molly Murphy MacGregor was invited to participate in The Women’s History Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, which was chaired by noted historian, Gerda Lerner and attended by the national leaders of organizations for women and girls. They  initiated similar celebrations within their own organizations, communities, and school districts, as Sonoma County had. In addition, they agreed to support an effort to secure a “National Women’s History Week.

 

In February 1980, President Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week. In the same year, Representative Barbara Mikulski, who at the time was in the House of Representatives, and Senator Orrin Hatch co-sponsored a Congressional Resolution for National Women’s History Week 1981. This co-sponsorship demonstrated the wide-ranging political support for recognizing, honoring, and celebrating the achievements of American women.

 

As word spread rapidly across the nation, departments of education encouraged celebrations of National Women’s History Week as an effective means to achieving equity goals within classrooms. Within a few years, thousands of schools and communities were celebrating National Women’s History Week, supported and encouraged by resolutions from governors, city councils, school boards, and the U.S. Congress. Each year, the dates of National Women’s History Week, (the week of March 8th) changed and every year a new lobbying effort was needed.   In 1987, Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month in perpetuity. A special Presidential Proclamation is issued every year which honors the extraordinary achievements of American women.

 

President Jimmy Carter’s Message to the Nation designated March 2-8, 1980 as National Women’s History Week.  “From the first settlers who came to our shores, from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.

 

 
As Dr. Gerda Lerner has noted, “Women’s History is Women’s Right.  It is an essential and indispensable heritage from which we can draw pride, comfort, courage, and long-range vision… I urge libraries, schools, and community organizations to focus their observances on the leaders who struggled for equality – – Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, and Alice Paul. Understanding the true history of our country will help us to comprehend the need for full equality under the law for all our people. This goal can be achieved by ratifying the 27th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which states that “Equality of Rights under the Law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

Works Cited: http://www.nwhp.org/

About Griffin Gallery:

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in Art through the Ages and invites you and a friend to visit our gallery at 5501 N. Federal Hwy in Boca Raton, FL to browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre- historic Native America.

 

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4       Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811     fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Griffin Gallery Celebrates New Location With Second Saturday Exhibition Opening On April 9th

Griffin Gallery invites you to its Second Saturday Exhibition Opening, April 9, 2016 in their NEW LOCATION:  5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4, Boca Raton, FL, just north of Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway.  At this time Griffin Gallery is offering special discounts up to 25% on most works of art and artifacts over the amount of $1,000. In the month of April Griffin Gallery will be featuring an illuminated Hebrew text, “Ethics Of the Fathers”.  The Rickie Report shares the details. This is a perfect opportunity to bring families to see “history” in a new way!

 

 

 

griffinlogo

5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4, Boca Raton, FL

561.994.0811

Just north of Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway

 

 

Public Reception

Saturday, April 9, 2106

2:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Free and Open to the Public

 

 

PIRKEI AVOT (Ethics of the Fathers)

 

Hand Crafted Book by Rabbi Yonah Weinrib
Collector’s Ed. 93 of 613
Contemporary Leather, Bound with illuminations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pirkei Avos01

 

Detail, Chapter One: Moses received the Torah at Sinai & transmitted it to Joshua, and Joshua to the Elders, and the Elders to the Prophets, and the Prophets handed it down to the Men of the Great Assembly. They stated three principles: Be deliberate in judgment; educate many disciples; and set protective bounds for the Torah.)

 

 

 

 

Pirkei Avos, or Avot,  “Ethics of the Fathers” is a compilation of teachings and maxims of the Rabbis of the Mishnaic period. The teachings of Pirkei Avot appear in the Mishnaic tractate of Avot the second-to-last tractate in the order of Nezikin in the Talmud. Pirkei Avot is unique in that it is the only tractate of the Talmud dealing solely with ethical and moral principles; there is little or no halacha (Jewish law) found in Pirkei Avot.

 

 

 

 

Rabbi Yonah Weinrib is an artist / calligrapher who specializes in elaborate, researched-based manuscript illumination. One of his commissions was for a presentation award by Jewish National Fund to the King of Jordan. He is the co-author and illuminator of the Bar Mitzvah Treasury with Rabbi Yaakov Salomon. According to the artist, the text of Pirkei Avot is nearly 2000 year old. Rabbi Weinrib has skillfully woven images, illumination, profound research and commentary to create this breathtaking masterpiece whose messages come alive with contemporary meaning and lessons for life.

 

 

 

 

 

Three and one half years of artistic endeavor and illumination commentary are reflected in this work. The edition, encased in a luxurious leather binding, with each of the 49 art prints housed in a protective mylar sleeve, is limited to 613 signed and numbered edition, plus 48 A.P. Sets. Over 539 editions have been subscribed to by prestigious museums, galleries, and private collectors worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

 

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by:

Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Announces Move To New Location In Boca Raton And Special Sale

Griffin Gallery has moved to a stunning new location, three miles north of the Boca Raton Museum of Art on Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway! You are invited to browse the splendid works of art including magnificent ancient artifacts, contemporary, fine, and tribal art. In addition they have beautiful antiques from centuries past to enhance your home or office. To celebrate, Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some photos of the new exhibit.  Stay tuned for news of the Gallery’s upcoming Grand Opening Gala.

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery

NEW LOCATION:
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

Griffin gallery2Federal gallery collage low res

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Avatars Of The Divine: Women In Pre-Columbian Society”

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Free Reception on Saturday, January 9th from 2:00 – 4:30 pm.  Artifacts focusing on women in Pre-Columbian society will be featured.  Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of the role of women in Pre-Columbian society, provided by Griffin Gallery. Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!  In addition,  The Griffin Gallery’s gift to you with a value of $30, is a printable FREE COMPLIMENTARY PASS for The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antique Show exhibiting the weekend of February 05 – 07, 2016.

 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

Public Reception:

AVATARS OF THE DIVINE:
WOMEN IN PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETY

Saturday, January 9, 2015

2:00 pm until 4:30 pm

 

Female Form01

 

 

“Women were not only daughters, wives, mothers, and grandmothers, but also healers, midwives, scribes, artists, poets, priestesses, warriors, governors, and even goddesses in pre-Columbian society,” says Dr. Judy L. Larson, Director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C.

 

 

For many years, archaeologists assumed that men monopolized the power in pre-Columbian civilizations. The discovery of women’s tombs in Zapotal, Mexico, in 1971, and San José de Moro, Peru, in 1991, challenged that assumption. These tombs gave ample testimony to the importance of women in both societies and evidence of their high social status.

 

 

 

The Peruvian tombs, among the richest ever excavated in the Americas and part of a larger suite of elite burial chambers, contained the remains of Late- (750-800 CE) and Transitional-period (850-1000 CE) Moche priestesses. Farther north, richly appointed tombs in the Mexican state of Veracruz, contained extraordinary terra-cotta figures that represent Cihuateteo, deified women who served as guides to the next world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women were not only priestesses in ancient society; they were considered goddesses, as well, by virtue of their unique reproductive role. Feminine nature, with its mysterious ability to create life, was accorded divine status. Numerous objects have been found in sculptures of wide-hipped women; clay and stone vessels depicting sexual intercourse; figurines and carvings showing women holding and nursing children, cupping their breasts and touching their genitalia—are powerful evidence for the central, supernatural role accorded fertility and birth.

 

 

 

 

In fact, religion permeated all facets of pre-Hispanic life. It was believed that every natural occurrence was an expression of the will of the gods, and every human undertaking was an attempt to obey that will. Thus, even domestic tasks like cooking, planting, gathering, and weaving, reflected a divine plan.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Columbian women practiced body adornment as a beauty and fashion aid, but also for religious and social purposes. Many objects in the exhibition, both Andean and Mesoamerican, show women with tattoos and body painting, scarification, as well as with intentional deformations of the cranium, lips, and ears. Beyond the mortal sphere, beyond the notion of women as avatars of the divine, were the goddesses worshipped by these ancient peoples.

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

PRINT AND USE THIS FREE PASS

Boca Show Invite

 

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon – 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: http://hispanicad.com/blog/news-article/had/art-literature/divine-and-human-women-ancient-mexico-and-peru

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Artifacts Of Ancient Syria At December Presentation

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Reception on Saturday, December 12th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. Artifacts from ancient Syria will be featured. Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past. To celebrate the upcoming holidays Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of Syria and the region provided by Griffin Gallery.  Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811         fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net      griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Public Reception:

 

ARTIFACTS OF ANCIENT SYRIA

Saturday, December 12, 2015

2:30 pm until 4:30 pm

 

ANCIENT GIFTS UNDER $500
Roman Glass Pendants, Broaches, and Maccabean Bronze Coins
In Contemporary 14K Gold and Silver Settings

GriffinGalleryHoliday Jewelry2015

Ancient Artifact Jewelry Pieces – On Sale for the Holidays!

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

GriffinGalleryDec2015Syrian01

Ancient Syria
Thomas Collelo, ed. Syria: A Country Study

Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1987

The first recorded mention of Greater Syria is in Egyptian annals detailing expeditions to the Syrian coastland to log the cedar, pine, and cypress of the Ammanus and Lebanon mountain ranges in the fourth millennium. Sumer, a kingdom of non-Semitic peoples that formed the southern boundary of ancient Babylonia, also sent expeditions in the third millennium, chiefly in pursuit of cedar from the Ammanus and gold and silver from Cilicia. The Sumerians most probably traded with the Syrian port city of Byblos, which was also negotiating with Egypt for exportation of timber and the resin necessary for mummification.

 

 

 

An enormous commercial network linking Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and the Syrian coast was developed. The network was perhaps under the aegis of the kingdom of Ebla (“city of the white stones”), the chief site of which was discovered in 1975 at Tall Mardikh, 64 kilometers south of Aleppo. Numerous tablets give evidence of a sophisticated and powerful indigenous Syrian empire, which dominated northern Syria and portions of lower Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran. Its chief rival was Akkad in southern Mesopotamia, which flourished circa 2300 B.C. In addition to identifying another great cultural and political power for the period–and an independent Syrian kingdom at that–the discovery of Ebla has had other important ramifications. The oldest Semitic language was thought to have been Amorite, but the newly found language of Ebla, a variant of Paleo-Canaanite, is considerably older. Ebla twice conquered the city of Mari, the capital of Amurru, the kingdom of the Semitic- speaking Amorites. After protracted tension between Akkad and Ebla, the great king of Akkad, Naram Sin, destroyed Ebla by fire in either 2300 or 2250. Naram Sin also destroyed Arman, which may have been an ancient name for Aleppo.

 

 

 

 

Amorite power was effectively eclipsed in 1600 when Egypt mounted a full attack on Greater Syria and brought the entire region under its suzerainty. During the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries, the area was in tremendous political upheaval because of the growing Assyrian power pressing from the east and invasions from the north of Hittites who eventually settled in north and central Syria.

 

 

 

Another Semitic-speaking people, the Canaanites, may have been part of the same migration that brought the Amorites into Syria from northern Arabia in approximately 2400. The Amorites came under the influence of Mesopotamia, whereas the Canaanites, who had intermarried with indigenous Syrians of the coast, were probably under the initial influence of Egypt.
The descendants of the intermarriages between Canaanites and coastal Syrians were the Phoenicians, the greatest seafaring merchants of the ancient world. The Phoenicians improved and developed iron tools and significantly advanced the art of shipbuilding. Their mastery of the seas allowed them to establish a network of independent city-states; however, these entities were never united politically, partially because of the continual harassment from Hittites to the north and Egyptians to the south. The name given to their land–Canaan in Hurrian, Phoenicia in Greek–refers to the fabulously valued purple dye extracted from mollusks found at that time only on the Syrian coast. From this period purple became the color of the robes of kings because only they and other small groups of the ancient Middle Eastern elite could afford to purchase the rare dye. The wealth derived in part from the dye trade sparked the economic flame that made it possible for Greater Syrian city-states to enjoy a wide measure of prosperity.
Many of Greater Syria’s major contributions to civilization were developed during the ancient period. Syria’s greatest legacy, the alphabet, was developed by Phoenicians during the second millennium. The Phoenicians introduced their 30-letter alphabet to the Aramaeans, among other Semitic-speaking people, and to the Greeks, who added vowel letters not used in Semitic grammatical construction.  The Phoenicians, somewhat pressed for space for their growing population, founded major colonies on the North African littoral, the most notable of which was Carthage. In the process of founding new city-states, they discovered the Atlantic Ocean.

 

 

The Aramaeans had settled in Greater Syria at approximately the end of the thirteenth century B.C., the same time at which the Jews, or Israelites, migrated to the area. The Aramaeans settled in the Mesopotamian-Syrian corridor to the north and established the kingdom of Aram, biblical Syria. As overland merchants, they opened trade to Southwest Asia, and their capital Damascus became a city of immense wealth and influence. At Aleppo they built a huge fortress, still standing. The Aramaeans simplified the Phoenician alphabet and carried their language, Aramaic, to their chief areas of commerce. Aramaic displaced Hebrew in Greater Syria as the vernacular (Jesus spoke Aramaic), and it became the language of commerce throughout the Middle East and the official language of the Persian Empire. Aramaic continued to be spoken in the Syrian countryside for almost 1,000 years, and in the 1980s remained in daily use in a handful of villages on the Syrian-Lebanese border. A dialect of Aramaic continues to be the language of worship in the Syrian Orthodox Church.
The plethora of city-states in Greater Syria could not withstand the repeated attacks from the north by the powerful Assyrian Empire, which under the leadership of Nebuchadnezzar finally overwhelmed them in the eighth century. Assyrian aggressors were replaced by the conquering Babylonians in the seventh century, and the then mighty Persian Empire in the sixth century. Under Persian aegis, Syria had a measure of self-rule, as it was to have under a succession of foreign rulers from that time until independence in the twentieth century. When Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire in 333, local political powers–which probably would have continued to contest for control of Greater Syria–were effectively shattered, and the area came into the strong cultural orbit of Western ideas and institutions.
At Alexander’s death, the empire was divided among five of his generals. General Seleucus became heir to the lands formerly under Persian control, which included Greater Syria. The Seleucids ruled for three centuries and founded a kingdom with the capital at Damascus, which later became referred to as the Kingdom of Syria. Seleucus named many cities after his mother, Laodicea; the greatest became Latakia, Syria’s major port.

 

 

Enormous numbers of Greek immigrants flocked to the Kingdom of Syria. Syrian trade was vastly expanded as a result of the newcomers’ efforts, reaching into India, the Far East, and Europe. The Greeks built new cities in Syria and colonized existing ones. Syrian and Greek cultures synthesized to create Near Eastern Hellenism, noted for remarkable developments in jurisprudence, philosophy, and science.  Replacing the Greeks and the Seleucids, Roman emperors inherited already thriving cities–Damascus, Tadmur (once called Palmyra), and Busra ash Sham in the fertile Hawran Plateau south of Damascus. Under the emperor Hadrian, Syria was prosperous and its cities, major trading centers; Hawran was a well-watered breadbasket. After making a survey of the country, the Romans established a tax system based on the potential harvest of farmlands; it remained the key to the land tax structure until 1945. They bequeathed Syria some of the grandest buildings in the world, as well as aqueducts, wells, and roads that were still in use in modern times.

 

 

 

Neither the Seleucids nor the Romans ruled the area without conflict. The Seleucids had to deal with powerful Arab peoples, the Nabataeans, who had established an empire at Petra (in present-day Jordan) and at Busra ash Sham. The Romans had to face the Palmyrenes, who had built Palmyra, a city even more magnificent than Damascus and the principal stop on the caravan route from Homs to the Euphrates.  By the time the Romans arrived, Greater Syrians had developed irrigation techniques, the alphabet, and astronomy. In A.D. 324 the Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, renaming it Constantinople (modern Istanbul). From there the Byzantines ruled Greater Syria, dividing it into two provinces: Syria Prima, with Antioch as the capital and Aleppo the major city; and Syria Secunda, ruled frequently from Hamah. Syria Secunda was divided into two districts: Phoenicia Prima, with Tyre as the capital; and Phoenicia Secunda, ruled from Damascus. (Most of Phoenicia Prima is now Lebanon.) The ruling families of Syria during this period were the Ghassanids, Christian Arabs loyal to Byzantium, from whom many Syrians now trace descent.

 

 

 

Byzantine rule in Syria was marked by constant warfare with the Persian Sassanian Empire to the east. In these struggles, Syria often became a battleground. In 611 the Persians succeeded in invading Syria and Palestine, capturing Jerusalem in 614. Shortly thereafter, the Byzantines counterattacked and retook their former possessions. During the campaign the Byzantines tried to force Greek orthodoxy on the Syrian inhabitants, but were unsuccessful. Beset by financial problems, largely as a result of their costly campaigns against the Persians, the Byzantines stopped subsidizing the Christian Arab tribes guarding the Syrian steppe. Some scholars believe this was a fatal mistake, for these tribes were then susceptible to a new force emanating from the south… Islam.  The Byzantine heritage remains in Syria’s Christian sects and great monastic ruins. In the fourth century A.D., Roman Emperor Theodosius destroyed the temple to Jupiter in Damascus and built a cathedral in honor of John the Baptist. The huge monastery at Dayr Siman near Aleppo, erected by Simeon Stylites in the fifth century, is perhaps the greatest Christian monument built before the tenth century.

 

 

For more information please contact:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail      Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net        griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon 0 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

*Works Cited: http://countrystudies.us/syria/3.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Invites You To Second Saturday Exhibition Opening And Offers Price Reductions Just In Time For The Holidays

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art cordially invites you to its Second Saturday Exhibition Opening on November 14th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. Contemporary watercolors by Eve Menes will be featured. Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past. To celebrate the upcoming holidays Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000.  The Rickie Report shares the details and a sneak peek of Menes’ artistry.

 

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811       fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net     griffingallery18@yahoo.com

“Sacred Journey Through Jerusalem”

Contemporary Watercolors

by

Eve Menes

Public Opening:

Saturday, November 14, 2015

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

 

 

 

 

GriffinGalleryJerusalem Garden

“Jerusalem Garden” by Eve Menes

 

 

 

“HISTORY OF WATERCOLOR:
WHEREFORTH IT CAME”

BY GREG CONLEY

(Courtesy of Griffin Gallery)

 

 

Watercolor came to western artists in the late 1400s. Artists had to formulate, prepare and grind their own watercolor paint and tended to keep their secret recipes and methods to themselves.

 

 

In the 18th century the first paint manufacturers set up shop in major European cities. They not only provided the basic pigments, resins and oils but found a market for readymade color pastes and other artist equipment. A famous example is an “herbal extract” shop in Paris that prepared the colors for Jean Baptiste Chardin when the artist’s failing eyesight prohibited him from making his own.

 

Artist’s watercolor paints came directly from the color men in dry clumps that had been cut off of clay-like slabs of prepared watercolor paint. The paints were hard. Artists would have to break up the clump into useable bits and grind them in water.

 

The usual method of preparing to paint included “rubbing up” your colors with water on a stone or ceramic dish as you would a sumi-e ink stick. Grinding your paint in water was a tedious but necessary step repeated every time you set up to paint. With time, artistic entrepreneurs began preparing ready-made paints for artists.

 

 

BEES PROVIDE A WATERCOLOR BREAKTHROUGH

 

After setting up shop in 1766 William Reeves (UK) began selling the first water soluble dry cake watercolors. By 1780 a bit of honey was added to the formulation to make the paint pliable for manufacture in various ways. Honey is a natural humectant, attracting and retaining moisture.

 

The first hard, but brush-soluble, cakes were fancily embossed with crests and heraldic figures. Mr. Reeves’ was even given an award “for the manufacture of Watercolor improved,” in 1781 for his moist pan watercolors.

 

By the mid to late 1830s inexpensive painting sets with little porcelain pans of moist watercolors were introduced to the general public to compete with the harder pressed cakes.

 

Winsor Newton introduced their glycerine-softened formula moist cakes in 1835. The public was pleased. Amateur artists, Sunday painters and ladies being cultured in finishing school rejoiced in easy accessibility of quality painter supplies. What could be better?

 

 

YANKEE INGENUITY, BAD CREDIT, AND BRITISH LUCK

 

 

American John Goffe Rand (1801-1873) patented the first collapsible metal tube for artist’s oil paint on September 11, 1841. He had traded off his European patent for the tubes to appease creditors.
By 1846 Winsor & Newton (UK) modified their original moist cake formula and created a semi-liquid formula for metal tubes. They improved upon Rand’s original tube design and ran with it. Everyone has been following ever since.

 

 

By the 1990s, through mergers and acquisitions several art supply manufacturers are now owned by the German paint company AB Wilhelm Becker. The AB Wilhelm Becker product lines include Winsor & Newton (UK), Reeves,Contè, Lefranc & Bourgeois, Liquitex and the Colart brands.

 

THE PRETTY COLORS

 

The chemical and dye makers during the Industrial Revolution in Britain made great strides in producing brighter and more permanent colors for the textile trades. These discoveries readily carried over to the fine arts.

 

By the late 18th and early 19th century, newly developed intense colors inspired the Pre-Raphaelites, while the new tube paints allowed the impressionists to work readily En plein air to capture natural light and color.

 

WATERCOLOR FOR THE MASSES

German-American Louis Prang (1824-1909) is the reason art education survives in American schools. He wrote the curriculum and text books, and then provided training for the first batch of America’s art teachers.

In 1856, Mr. Prang contracted with the American Crayon Company to manufacturer his non-toxic moist pan watercolor sets designed for students. They were a huge success. Prang watercolors continue to be a staple art supply in classrooms worldwide.

 

 

AND NOW, ANYONE CAN PAINT

 

This new availability of artist’s materials gave even those with a casual interest in art the means and tools to explore their creative talents. Art had the means to come to the masses, giving birth to many “Sunday painters” and amateur “dabblers” and brought real-world art supplies within the reach of children.

 

There are now a couple dozen watercolor paint manufacturers for artists to choose from. Each has their own take on formulas and there is a wide gulf of difference in the quality of watercolor paints available. The 8-color set that you pick up at the corner drugstore can never match the depth of color and pure brushability of the finest artist grade tube watercolors. They are a good place to get a little of the feel of painting watercolor before you invest your grocery money.

 

Artists searching their creative roots today will locate the old formulas and techniques in an effort to revive the true “craft” of being an artist. On the other hand, for ease of use and consistent quality, the rest of us can gladly leave the craft of paint making to the professionals, some with centuries of experience, so we can concentrate on the creation of art.

 

GRIFFIN GALLERY:

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art    

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail    Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811     fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

*Works Cited: http://watercolorpainting.com/history

 

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon 0 5:00 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Offers Magnificent Antiquities, Fine Art And Folk Art With Special Autumn Discounts Plus Monthly Exhibtions

Autumn is the perfect time for a beginner to start a collection of ancient artifacts, or for the seasoned collector to procure a new acquisition.  Mark your calendar for the SECOND SATURDAY of each month as Griffin Gallery Ancient Art has changed its exhibition opening dates and hours. To celebrate, there are price reductions up to 20% on most ancient artifacts, antiques, and works of fine art. Please join us on Saturday, October 10, 2015 from 2:30 until 4:30 pm in our gallery to view ancient artifacts, splendid antiques of centuries past, and contemporary works of fine art. In October we are featuring Chinese Antique Furniture of the Qing Dynasty.  The Rickie Report shares the details and images of some of these extraordinary pieces.

 

 

griffinlogo

G R I F F I N   G A L L E R Y

 

You Are Invited:

 Second Saturday Exhibition

October 10, 2015

 

2:30  –  4:30 P.M.

Gallery Center

 608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431

 561.994.0811

   
www.griffingallery.net     griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

GriffinGalleryjpegs

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art has over 500 magnificent ancient artifacts in its inventory. Beginning October 01, 2015, purchase one artifact over $1,000 and receive a 20 % savings. Buy two and receive a 25% savings, and purchase three ancient works of art and receive up to a 30% discount. Note that shipping is not included with these special discounts.  

 

 

 

 

GriffingalleryQing Red Cabinet01

A magnificent 18th Century Red Lacquer Cabinet
China, Shanxi Province
Height 69”, Width 41”, Depth 19”

 

 

 

Qing Dynasty Furniture

 

According to the Travel China Guide, at the beginning of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), furniture followed Ming patterns and styles. During the reign of Emperors Kangxi, Yong Zheng, and Qian Long, Qing Furniture showed its own uniqueness with the absorption of western art. It was larger in size with grandeur and pageantry.
Engraving was a popular and important means of furniture decoration. The subjects range from auspicious character patterns, to geometric patterns and scenes in nature with animals, mountains and waters, flowers and grass. Color painting, especially gold painting, was widely used.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Qing Bamboo Desk

 

 

Furniture Making Centers

The centers were formed in Beijing, Shanxi, Guangzhou and Suzhou.
In the Forbidden City in Beijing (Jing for short), the best craftsmen used the choicest wood to make Jing-styled furniture under the guidance of the emperors.

 

 

Furniture made in Guangdong (Guang for short) shows the influence of Western art. In contrast to the Su-style, Guang-style is unstinting in the use of material, and the furniture looks solid and massive. The Ancestral Temple of the Chen Family in Guangzhou has a display of Guang-style furniture.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Qing-Noodle-Cabinet

 

Furniture from Suzhou (Su for short) and surrounding area enjoys the highest artistic value. Suzhou gardens such as Lingering Garden, Garden of the Master of the Nets, Humble Administrator’s Garden, and Lion Grove Garden feature precious collections of Su-styled furniture.
Furniture made in Shanxi (Jin for short) is a harmonious blending of royal demeanor and local cultural heritage. Shanxi was one of the richest places in China during the Qing Dynasty, of which Rishengchang Exchange Shop in Pingyao, the earliest bank in China, is good evidence. With the increasing importance of Jin merchants, commercial symbols emerged, such as patterns concerning money and fortune. Unlike other styles, Jin-style has less engraving; instead, inlays of stone, porcelain and bone, which catch the eye more easily than exquisite engraving, are used to tell of the luxurious lifestyle of the owner. In addition, color and gold painting become the vogue depicting the preference for gaudiness by the wealthy. Another feature of Jin-styled furniture is the widely applied walnut wood.

 

 

Griffin GalleryQing Altar Ivory Table1

Qing Altar Ivory Table

 

 

The ancient Ming and Qing Streets, Qiao’s Compound and Wang’s Compound in Pingyao, Shanxi, provide a sufficient testimony to the aesthetic and cultural achievement in Jin-style furniture. Chinese Ming and Qing Furniture Gallery of Shanghai Museum is an ideal place to appreciate various styles of classical furniture.  In the past 20 years, Ming and Qing furniture has enjoyed an elevated reputation as art and as investment, and its value is increasing.

 

GRIFFIN GALLERY:

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Bring Your Unique Antiques Or Ancient Artifacts To Griffin Gallery This Saturday

This summer it’s time to dust off that unique antique or ancient artifact in your home or office to see if there is a possible consignment with Griffin Gallery Ancient Art. Please join Griffin Gallery on Saturday, August 08, 2015 for refreshments as you’ll have the opportunity to submit your unusual antiques and ancient artifacts for consignment. Please note that only accepted submissions will be provided with a retail appraisal. The Rickie Report shares the details of the August 8th event and some sneak peeks of consigned pieces here.

 

griffinlogo

 

 

YOU ARE INVITED:

Saturday, August 8th

11 am – 4 pm

Accepting Consignments of

Unique Antique and Ancient Art

(Prior to the 20th Century)

Artifacts, Sculpture, Art, Jewelry, Etc.

If you are unable to attend this gala event, please submit your photographs with detailed descriptions to griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

 

Unique Antiques and Ancient Artifacts on consignment at Griffin Gallery

Unique Antiques and Ancient Artifacts on consignment at Griffin Gallery

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Time To Submit Unusual Antiques And Ancient Artifacts To Griffin Gallery Of Ancient Art For Consignment

This summer it’s time to dust off that unique antique or ancient artifact in your home or office to see if there is a possible consignment with Griffin Gallery Ancient Art.  Please join Griffin Gallery on Saturday, August 08, 2015 for refreshments as you’ll have the opportunity to submit your unusual antiques and ancient artifacts for consignment. Please note that only accepted submissions will be provided with a retail appraisal. The Rickie Report shares the details of the August 8th event and some sneak peeks of consigned pieces here. 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

YOU ARE INVITED:

Saturday, August 8th

11 am – 4 pm

Accepting Consignments of

Unique Antique and Ancient Art

(Prior to the 20th Century)

Artifacts, Sculpture, Art, Jewelry, Etc.

If you are unable to attend this gala event, please submit your photographs with detailed descriptions to griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811    fax: 561.994.1855

 

 

 

GriffinConsignment

Various Consigned Pieces With Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Shares The Allure Of Blanc De Chine

Griffin Gallery shares the beauty of Blanc de Chine (lit. “white of China”), a white ware that was produced for centuries in the town of Dehua in the coastal province of Fujian. The sugary white clay of the Dehua area is made from a porcelain stone that is unusually low in iron impurities and fuses with the applied transparent glaze during the firing, producing works of a glossy, smooth quality that resembles ivory or white jade. The Rickie Report shares the details of the exhibit and strongly urges families to visit this treasure trove of history to make it come alive!

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Presents:

THE BEAUTY OF BLANC DE CHINE

Featuring a Qing Dynasty Guan Yin Riding a Dragon
Dehua Ware, South China, Fujian Province,
Ca. 1775 – 1825

Public Reception:

Thursday, April 9, 2015

5:00 – 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through May 13, 2015. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

 

 

Qing Quan Yin Blanc De Chine

Qing Quan Yin Blanc De Chine

Blanc de Chine (lit. “white of China”) refers to a white ware that was produced for centuries in the town of Dehua in the coastal province of Fujian. The sugary white clay of the Dehua area is made from a porcelain stone that is unusually low in iron impurities and fuses with the applied transparent glaze during the firing, producing works of a glossy, smooth quality that resembles ivory or white jade. Extremely resistant to the distortion that can be caused by high-temperature firing, the clay is ideally suited for the production of thickly potted, press-molded and/or sculpted vessels and figurines for the scholar’s table or family altar. Many such functional and decorative works are finely detailed or embellished with applied relief decoration, such as blossoms or dragons.

 

 

Porcelain production began in Dehua as early as the Song dynasty (960-1279) and flourished from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. At first widely exported to Southeast Asia and Japan, blanc de Chine soon also found a market among European royalty and aristocrats when it was imported by various European trading companies. Western interest in blanc de Chine gradually waned as Europeans discovered the secrets of porcelain manufacture. Dehua kilns have continued to produce white ware figures into the modern age; these late versions are usually slip-cast.

 

 

Griffin Gallery:

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

For More information:

561.994.0811    fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

Works Cited:

http://www.worcesterart.org/exhibitions/the-allure-blanc-de-chine

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291