3 Artists Showcased At “Florida Roots” Exhibit At Courthouse Cultural Arts Center In Stuart, FL

Did you know the arts pack a punch with $27 million impact in Martin County, FL?  The ARTS really MATTER!!  Located in downtown Stuart, FL,  The Arts Council of Martin County offers a wide variety of experiences for the public and for artists.  Currently,  “Florida Roots”, an exhibit showcasing the artworks of  Diane Richmond Hall, Donald Neal, and Delford Terry is not to be missed!  It is available until January 27th, at the Courthouse Cultural Arts Center so make time to stop by!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

Courthouse Cultural Art Center

80 SE Ocean Blvd    Stuart, FL

772.287.6676           www.MartinArts.org

The Arts Council of Martin County  Presents:

“FLORIDA    ROOTS”

Exhibit is available NOW through January 27th

 

 

 

 

Diane Richmond Hall

 

 

Diane Richmond Hall shares that her first artistic piece was acknowledged at age 5 years and she has not stopped since!  Encouraged by family members and teachers, she is primarily self-taught.  At age 12 she began experimenting with oil paints.  Her late husband, Ellis (aka “Sweet”) was her biggest fan.  She says, ” He encouraged me and enabled me to study with professionals in a few workshops in DC, Boston, Sarasota and Scottsdale, to hone my skills. He was very involved with my art, making canvases and doing art shows with me. If it wasn’t for him, I would not be at the level I am today. I have a 40-minute portrait sketch from life that I did of him. After the sitting, I didn’t continue to develop the painting because it shows his essence, spirit and personality. I didn’t want to lose that. While not a fully developed piece, it is my nod to “Sweet”. It will be the first art show I have done without him in 40 years”.

 

“Sharon” by Diane Richmond Hall

 

 

Raised in Bell Glade, FL, the isolation of the location gave her the time and freedom to explore her artistic side without too many distractions that she may have had in a bigger city.  Diane works 24 – 30 hours a week at her artistry.  She tells us, ” I’ve been thrilled to have been accepted in every juried show I have ever applied for. I’ve had the honor of receiving of Best in Show, Best in Painting, Poster Awards, Purchase Awards and Awards of Distinction etc. I feel truly blessed”.  Preferring to work in oils, her work has been published in art journals and national magazines.

 

“Five Easy Pieces” by Diane Richmond Hall

 

 

Diane returns to images of people and by extension people in reflective sunglasses.  She shares, “At an art show I was once asked if I was afraid of life. I replied, “no, what makes you ask that?” They said because I painted people hidden behind sunglasses. I said, “the simple answer is it isn’t anything that deep. By painting people in sunglasses, I get to paint two pictures in one.” And by the way, I paint people without glasses too.  It’s funny how often people try to figure out the deeper psychological and philosophical reasons behind artistic decisions when the artist may have just felt it was the natural thing to do, much like adding an ingredient to a recipe”.

 

 

 

Donald Neal

 

Donald Neal remembers being praised since his early childhood for his artistic talent. He was considered an art prodigy. When he was in 10th grade, he began thinking about college…”I knew I wanted to go to school to learn to be an even better artist. So I guess it was at that time I knew I wanted that as my career”. His earliest champions were two art teachers, Emanuel Garrett and Leroy Williams, who recognized his talent. His other mentors included Beanie Backus for a brief time and Rubin Hale. “When Emanuel Garrett took me to museums and such, it opened my world”.

“Da Vinci” by Donald Neal

 

 

 

Raised in Belle Glade, FL, there were not a lot of opportunities to learn from teachers so Donald used books and did a lot of self-study.  His parents were very artistic and did art when not working.  He works 16- 25 hours a week on his artistry.  Having won a few awards at juried art shows, Donald says ” The South Florida Cultural Consortium” was influential.  His work has been published  in art journals and national magazines.

 

“Death” by Donald Neal

 

 

Donald’s preferred subjects are women, nude paintings and sculpture.  Preferring clay as his medium, he says, ” I usually just begin with an idea and I know it is going to be changing as I go along. I enjoy that process the most. My best work has come from times I’ve messed up and corrected to be better than the first way”.  How does he choose his subject? ” I start off seeing a woman whose form I admire and then I start thinking of how to pose and render her”.

 

 

Delford Terry

 

Delford Terry recalls drawing feverishly at a very early age. Tom Prestopnik and Thomas Wetzl played significant roles in his artistic development as a young artist and advancing his college education.  Raised in Mile End St. Ann Jamaica, he says, “ I was inspired by the environment. Like, the river, fruits, landscape and ships… In the early 90’s  I lived in Indiantown Florida and it was there I was influence by the artist activities in high school and making art is a way out, especially when adjusting to a new environment. However, in 2010 I return to Jamaica and my palette and medium have changed, and I found aspirations to paint about Jamaica”.

 

“Pure Virginity” by Delford Terry

 

 

 

He continuously works in his sketch book and entered the 2016 the National Portrait Gallery’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition and made it to the semifinalist.  Delford ‘s work was featured in the Professional Artist Magazine ( December 2011 through January 2012) and Arc Magazine (Issue 4). November 2011 through January 2012 (Spotlight segment).

 

“Strange Fruit” by Delford Terry

 

 

Delford shares, “I think about the arrangements of things more often than the subject matter, because the subject is always there and I do not have to look far.  The pencil, paper, and colored dirt are what I use to lay the foundation of my work. These three basic elements bond human and cultural traditions. I feel connected to these fundamental substances. The historical radiation of these materials ground me in the resources of the past. However, I am not opposed to using other materials if they allow me to express the ideas I am exploring. With that said, I enjoy documenting my family and friends–from both Caribbean and American cultures–with common things that can be easily infused with metaphoric reference. Depicting my friends and family fills me with awe and wonder of not just the subject, but of the process. My goal is to communicate to the viewer a sense of wonder and to reveal some obscure observation to them through extreme realism in a celebratory manner. I strive to capture the emotional depth of my friends and family, and to paint them as I see them, their hopes, and their memories”.

 

Excerpts and quotes from MartinArtsMagazine Fall 2017. To read full interviews: https://issuu.com/martinarts/docs/martinarts_magazine_aug_25_issuu

For more information about this exhibit, upcoming exhibits and events please visit:

The Arts Council 

Court House Cultural Center

80 SE Ocean Blvd.   Stuart, FL 34994

772.287.6676

www.MartinArts.org

 

 

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